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Individual Differences in Personality Conducive to Engagement in Aggression and Violence

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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: Individual Differences in Personality Conducive to Engagement in Aggression and Violence Volume 27, Issue 4, 410, Article first published online: July 2013

  • Note: Correction added on 1 July 2013. The author's name has been corrected to read “Reid Griffith Fontaine” not “Reid Griffin Fontaine”, and his affiliation has been corrected to “Duke University”.

Correspondence to: Gian Vittorio Caprara, Psychology Department, Sapienza University of Rome, Via dei Marsi 78, 00185 Rome, Italy.

E-mail: gianvittorio.caprara@uniroma1.it

Abstract

This paper examined empirically the value of a conceptual model in which emotional stability and agreeableness contribute to engagement in aggression and violence (EAV) indirectly through irritability, hostile rumination and moral disengagement. Three hundred and forty young adults (130 male and 190 female) participated in the study. The average age of participants was 21 at time 1 and 25 at time 2. Findings attested to the role of basic traits (i.e. agreeableness and emotional stability) and specific personality dispositions (i.e. irritability and hostile rumination) in predisposing to EAV and to the pivotal role of moral disengagement in giving access to aggressive and violent conduct. In particular, the mediational model attested to the pivotal role of emotional stability and agreeableness in contributing directly to both hostile rumination and irritability and indirectly to moral disengagement, and to EAV. Agreeableness and hostile rumination contribute to moral disengagement that plays a key role in mediating the relations of all examined variables with EAV. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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