The relationship between cognitive emotion regulation strategies and emotional problems: comparison between a clinical and a non-clinical sample

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Abstract

This study focuses on the relationship between the use of specific cognitive emotion regulation strategies and emotional problems. Two samples were included: 99 adults from a clinical population and 99 matched non-clinical adults. Data was obtained in both groups on the use of nine cognitive emotion regulation strategies: self-blame, other-blame, rumination, catastrophizing, putting into perspective, positive refocusing, positive reappraisal, acceptance, and refocus on planning.

Logistic regression analyses show that self-blame, catastrophizing, and positive reappraisal were, relative to the other strategies, the most important variables for distinguishing between the two samples. While the first two strategies were reported significantly more often by the clinical than by the non-clinical sample, positive reappraisal was reported significantly more often by the non-clinical sample. The results suggest that cognitive emotion regulation strategies may be a useful target for prevention and intervention. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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