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The ‘Short Five’ (S5): Measuring personality traits using comprehensive single items

Authors

  • Kenn Konstabel,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
    2. National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia
    3. University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    • Institute of Psychology, University of Tartu, Tiigi 78, Tartu 50410, Estonia.
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    • Kenn Konstabel, Department of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Health Development, Estonia, Institute of Psychology, University of Tartu, Estonia, and College of Medicine, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Jan-Erik Lönnqvist and Markku Verkasalo, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland; Gari Walkowitz, Bonn Laboratory for Experimental Economics, University of Bonn, Germany and Department of Management, University of Cologne, Germany; Kätlin Konstabel, The Gifted and Talented Development Centre, University of Tartu, Estonia.

  • Jan-Erik Lönnqvist,

    1. University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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  • Gari Walkowitz,

    1. University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
    2. University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
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  • Kätlin Konstabel,

    1. University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
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  • Markku Verkasalo

    1. University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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Abstract

A new approach to the construction of short questionnaires is introduced: ‘comprehensive single items’ (CSI) are developed with the intention to match expert descriptions of a construct as closely as possible. Based on this idea, a 60-item questionnaire, the ‘Short Five’ (S5) is constructed for measuring 30 facets of the Five-Factor Model. Studies in Estonian, Finnish, English, and German showed that the S5 domain scales had correlations over 0.8 with their counterparts in longer questionnaires, and that the factor structure was similar to that of the normative US NEO-PI-R sample. The S5 can be recommended for large-scale studies where participants' time is limited. The CSI approach can be successfully used in short scale development, in addition to more traditional methods. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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