Recommendations for Meeting the Pediatric Patient's Need for a Clinical Pharmacist: A Joint Opinion of the Pediatrics Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group

Authors

  • Varsha Bhatt-Mehta,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Marcia L. Buck,

    1. University of Virginia Children's Hospital, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia
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  • Allison M. Chung,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, Auburn University School of Pharmacy, Mobile, Alabama
    2. Department of Pediatrics, University of South Alabama School of Medicine, Mobile, Alabama
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  • Elizabeth A. Farrington,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Betty H. Cameron Women's and Children's Hospital, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, North Carolina
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  • Tracy M. Hagemann,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
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  • David S. Hoff,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota and College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
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  • Joseph M. LaRochelle,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, Xavier University of Louisiana, College of Pharmacy, New Orleans, Louisiana
    2. Department of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
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  • Rebecca S. Pettit,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana
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  • Hanna Phan,

    1. Departments of Pharmacy Practice and Science and Pediatrics, Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
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  • Amy L. Potts,

    1. Department of Pharmacy, Monroe Carell Jr Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, Tennessee
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  • Katherine P. Smith,

    1. Department of Pharmacy Practice, Roseman University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, South Jordan, Utah
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  • Richard H. Parrish II

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacy, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children/Tenet Healthcare, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Pharmacy Practice, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical College of Virginia School of Pharmacy, Richmond, Virginia
    3. Department of Pharmacy, Alberta Health Service, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    • Department of Pharmacy, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • This paper represents the opinions of the Pediatrics Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) and the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG). It does not necessarily represent an official ACCP or PPAG commentary, guideline, or statement of policy or position.

For questions or comments, contact Richard H. Parrish II, BSPharm, Ph.D., BCPS, The Royal Alexandra Hospital, Department of Pharmacy Services, 10240 Kingsway Avenue, North West, Edmonton, Alberta T5H 3V9, Canada; e-mail: richard.parrish@albertahealthservices.ca.

Abstract

Children warrant access to care from clinical pharmacists trained in pediatrics. The American College of Clinical Pharmacy Pediatrics Practice and Research Network (ACCP Pediatrics PRN) released an opinion paper in 2005 with recommendations for improving the quality and quantity of pediatric pharmacy education in colleges of pharmacy, residency programs, and fellowships. Although progress has been made in increasing the availability of pediatric residencies, there is still much to be done to meet the direct care needs of pediatric patients. The purpose of this joint opinion paper is to outline strategies and recommendations for expanding the quality and capacity of pediatric clinical pharmacy practitioners by elevating the minimum expectations for pharmacists entering pediatric practice, standardizing pediatric pharmacy education, expanding the current number of pediatric clinical pharmacists, and creating an infrastructure for development of pediatric clinical pharmacists and clinical scientists. These recommendations may be used to provide both a conceptual framework and action items for schools of pharmacy, health care systems, and policymakers to work together to increase the quality and quantity of pediatric training, practice, and research initiatives.

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