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Compatibilization of immiscible nylon 6/poly(vinylidene fluoride) blends using graphene oxides

Authors

  • Jinghui Yang,

    Corresponding author
    • Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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  • Chenxia Feng,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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  • Jian Dai,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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  • Nan Zhang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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  • Ting Huang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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  • Yong Wang

    Corresponding author
    • Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
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Correspondence to: Jinghui Yang and Yong Wang,Key Laboratory of Advanced

Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science

and Engineering,Southwest Jiaotong University,Erhuan Road, North I, No.

111, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031, China. E-mail: yangjinghui_84@163.com;

yongwang1976@163.com

Abstract

A new strategy to compatibilize immiscible blends is proposed, using graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets taking advantage of their unique amphiphilic structures. When 0.5 or 1 wt% GOs were incorporated in immiscible nylon 6/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) (90/10 wt%) blends, the dimension of PVDF dispersed particles was markedly reduced and became more uniform, revealing a well-defined compatibilization effect of GOs on the immiscible blends. Correspondingly, the ductility of the compatibilized blends increased several times compared with uncompatibilized immiscible blends. In order to explore the underlying compatibilization mechanism, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra were applied to suggest that the edge polar groups of GOs can form hydrogen bonds with nylon 6 while the basal plane of GOs can interact with electron-withdrawing fluorine on PVDF chains leading to the so-called charge-transfer C–F bonding. In this case, GOs exhibit favorable interactions with both nylon 6 and PVDF phase, therefore stabilizing the interface during GO migrations from PVDF/GO masterbatch to nylon 6 phase, which can minimize the interfacial tension and finally lead to compatibilization effects. Obviously, this work may open a broad prospect for GOs to be widely applied as a new compatibilizer in industrial fields. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry

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