Crisis prevention and intervention: A survey of school psychologists

Authors

  • Amanda B. Nickerson,

    Corresponding author
    1. University at Albany—State University of New York
    • Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, ED 232, University at Albany—State University of New York, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222. E-mail: anickerson@uamail.albany.edu
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elizabeth J. Zhe

    1. University at Albany—State University of New York
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

A random sample of 197 practicing school psychologists who were members of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) completed a survey questionnaire on experiences and perceptions with regard to school crisis preparedness, prevention, and intervention. Respondents indicated having the most direct experience with student–student physical assaults, serious illness or injury of students, unexpected students deaths, suicide attempts, and guns or other weapons at school. School psychologists reported that their schools used a wide variety of prevention and intervention strategies, most of which have been advocated in the literature. Respondents reported being most involved in the implementation of crisis prevention and intervention strategies and less involved in development and evaluation. Results and implications are discussed within the context of empirically supported practices and school psychologists' readiness to assume larger roles in crisis prevention and intervention. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Psychol Schs 41: 777–788, 2004.

Ancillary