USING SELF-MANAGEMENT INTERVENTIONS TO ADDRESS GENERAL EDUCATION BEHAVIORAL NEEDS: ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVENESS AND FEASIBILITY

Authors


  • We extend our sincere thanks to Liana Singer for her help with intervention implementation, as well as Betsy Hemphill, Caitlin Jones, Corrine Mahoney, Casey McPherson, and Lynn Rabson for making data collection possible. This project was funded through a grant provided by the Society for the Study of School Psychology (SSSP).

Correspondence to: Amy M. Briesch, Northeastern University, Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: a.briesch@neu.edu

Abstract

A comprehensive self-management intervention was utilized to increase the on-task behavior of three African American students within an urban middle-school setting. The intervention was designed to necessitate minimal management on the part of the general education classroom teacher by utilizing an electronic prompting device, as well as a centralized intervention coordinator for the management of training, implementation, and progress monitoring. Results suggested that implementation of the intervention resulted in improvement in on-task behavior across all three students; however, problems with inconsistent implementation necessitated that modifications be made to the intervention procedures. Implications for the design and implementation of self-management interventions within general education secondary-level settings are discussed.

Ancillary