VIOLENT AND PROSOCIAL BEHAVIOR BY ADOLESCENTS TOWARD PARENTS AND TEACHERS IN A COMMUNITY SAMPLE

Authors


  • This research was supported by two grants from the University of the Basque Country, Spain (EHU06/95, UFI 11/04). The first author would also like to thank the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire for their hospitality during her scientific stay, which greatly facilitated the completion of this article.

Correspondence to: Joana Jaureguizar, University of the Basque Country, University College of Teacher Training, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Lejona (Bizkaia), Spain. E-mail: joana.jauregizar@ehu.es

Abstract

This study focused on violent and prosocial behaviors by adolescents toward parents and teachers, and the relation between such behaviors and adolescents’ perceptions about the family and school environment. Gender differences in child-to-parent violence and student-to-teacher violence were also studied. The sample comprised 687 adolescents from secondary schools in the province of Gipuzkoa, Spain, aged between 12 and 16 years. Participants responded to the relationship domains of the Family Environment Scale and the Classroom Environment Scale, among other instruments. A positive family relationship was related to less violent and more prosocial behavior toward parents. However, a positive classroom relationship was associated only with more prosocial behavior toward teachers. The results show that criminal and antisocial behaviors had a mediating influence on the relation between family and school relationships and violence against authority. The implications for intervention and prevention programs are discussed.

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