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MULTIPLE DIMENSIONS OF PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT AND ITS LINKS TO YOUNG ADOLESCENT SELF-EVALUATION AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

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Correspondence to: Nurit Kaplan Toren, University of Haifa–Education, 23 Peretz Berenstein St., Haifa 34981, Israel. E-mail: ntoren@edu.haifa.ac.il

Abstract

Drawing on early research on parental involvement and its effect on children's school functioning, it was hypothesized in this study that parents’ educational involvement is positively related to two indicators of school functioning: academic self-competence and academic achievement. However, in light of research on the distinction between parents’ home- and school-based educational involvement in terms of their different provisions of parents’ school-related support, this study examined the relationship between each of these two bases and two adolescent outcomes: self-evaluation (consisting of global self-worth and scholastic self-evaluation) and school-reported academic achievement. Analyses using structural equation modeling (SEM) on data collected from 397 (187 girls) Israeli seventh-graders (first year of junior high school) confirm the distinction between home- and school-based parental involvement and their different links to adolescent outcomes. SEM analyses carried out separately for girls and boys showed positive links between home-based parental involvement for girls and parent's volunteering for boys and global self-worth. This analysis also showed direct negative links between school-based parental involvement and academic achievement for boys. The discussion addresses these differences and their implication for the school experiences of young adolescents in the wake of the transition to junior high school.

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