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Shotgun proteomic analysis of human-induced sputum

Authors

  • Ben Nicholas Dr.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Infection, Inflammation and Repair, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK
    • Inflammatory Cell Biology Group, Division of Infection, Inflammation and Repair, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK Fax: +44-2380-511761
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  • Paul Skipp,

    1. Centre for Proteomic Research and School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton, UK
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  • Richard Mould,

    1. Division of Infection, Inflammation and Repair, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK
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  • Stephen Rennard,

    1. Nebraska Medical Centre, Pulmonary and Critical Care Section, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, USA
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  • Donna E. Davies,

    1. Division of Infection, Inflammation and Repair, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK
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  • C. David O'Connor,

    1. Centre for Proteomic Research and School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton, UK
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  • Ratko Djukanović

    1. Division of Infection, Inflammation and Repair, School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK
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Abstract

Induced sputum is a readily accessible biological fluid whose composition may alter as a consequence of disease. To date, however, the proteins that routinely populate this biofluid are largely unknown, in part due to the technical difficulties in processing such mucin-rich samples. To provide a catalogue of sputum proteins, we have surveyed the proteome of human-induced sputum (sputome). A combination of 2-D gel analysis and GeLC-MS/MS allowed a total of 191 human proteins to be confidently assigned. In addition to the expected components, several hitherto unreported proteins were found to be present, including three members of the annexin family, kallikreins 1 and 11, and peroxiredoxins 1, 2 and 5. Other sets of proteins identified included four proteins previously annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. Taken together, these data represent the first extensive survey of the proteome of induced sputum and provide a platform for future identification of biomarkers of lung disease.

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