Application of electron transfer dissociation (ETD) for the analysis of posttranslational modifications

Authors

  • Julia Wiesner,

    1. Rudolf-Virchow-Center, DFG Research Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Wuerzburg, Germany
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  • Thomas Premsler,

    1. Rudolf-Virchow-Center, DFG Research Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Wuerzburg, Germany
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  • Albert Sickmann Professor

    Corresponding author
    1. Rudolf-Virchow-Center, DFG Research Center for Experimental Biomedicine, Wuerzburg, Germany
    2. Institute for Analytical Sciences (ISAS), Dortmund, Germany
    3. Medizinisches Proteom-Center (MPC), Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany
    • Institute for Analytical Sciences (ISAS), Bunsen-Kirchhoff-Straße 11, D-44139 Dortmund, Germany Fax: +49-231-1392-310
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Abstract

Despite major advantages in the field of proteomics, the analysis of PTMs still poses a major challenge; thus far, preventing insights into the role and regulation of protein networks. Additionally, top-down sequencing of proteins is another powerful approach to reveal comprehensive information for biological function. A commonly used fragmentation technique in MS-based peptide sequencing is CID. As CID often fails in PTM-analysis and performs best on doubly-charged, short and middle-sized peptides, confident peptide identification may be hampered. A newly developed fragmentation technique, namely electron transfer dissociation (ETD), supports both, PTM- and top-down analysis, and generally results in more confident identification of long, highly charged or modified peptides. The following review presents the theoretical background of ETD and its technical implementation in mass analyzers. Furthermore, current improvements of ETD and approaches for the PTM-analysis and top-down sequencing are introduced. Alternating both fragmentation techniques, ETD and CID, increases the amount of information derived from peptide fragmentation, thereby enhancing both, peptide sequence coverage and the confidence of peptide and protein identification.

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