Short-term effects of salt exposure on the maize chloroplast protein pattern

Authors

  • Christian Zörb,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Plant Nutrition (IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Institute of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Hermann-Rodewald-Str. 2, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel, Germany
    • Institute of Plant Nutrition (IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26–32, 35392, Giessen, Germany Fax: +49-431-8801625
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  • Ramona Herbst,

    1. Institute of Plant Nutrition (IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany
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  • Christoph Forreiter,

    1. Department of Plant Physiology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany
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  • Sven Schubert

    1. Institute of Plant Nutrition (IFZ), Justus Liebig University Giessen, Giessen, Germany
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Abstract

It is of fundamental importance to understand the physiological differences leading to salt resistance and to get access to the molecular mechanisms underlying this physiological response. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of short-term salt exposure on the proteome of maize chloroplasts in the initial phase of salt stress (up to 4 h). It could be shown that sodium ions accumulate quickly and excessively in chloroplasts in the initial phase of moderate salt stress. A change in the chloroplast protein pattern was observed without a change in water potential of the leaves. 2-DE revealed that 12 salt-responsive chloroplast proteins increased while eight chloroplast proteins decreased. Some of the maize chloroplast proteins such as CF1e and a Ca2+-sensing receptor show a rather transient response for the first 4 h of salt exposure. The enhanced abundance of the ferredoxin NADPH reductase, the 23 kDa polypeptide of the photosystem II, and the FtsH-like protein might reflect mechanism to attenuate the detrimental effects of Na+ on the photosynthetic machinery. The observed transient increase and subsequent decrease of selected proteins may exhibit a counterbalancing effect of target proteins in this context. Intriguingly, several subunits of the CF1–CF0 complex are unequally affected, whereas others do not respond at all.

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