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Identification of centromeric and telomeric DNA-binding proteins in rice

Authors

  • Qi He,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
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  • Lei Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
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  • Yu Xu,

    1. State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
    Current affiliation:
    1. Nutrition and Health Research Institute, Beijing, P. R. China
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  • Weichang Yu

    Corresponding author
    • State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Fig. 1 in colour.

Correspondence: Professor Weichang Yu, State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

E-mail: yuwc@cuhk.edu.hk

Fax: +852-2603-6382

Abstract

Centromeres and telomeres are DNA/protein complexes and essential functional components of eukaryotic chromosomes. Previous studies have shown that rice centromeres and telomeres are occupied by CentO (rice centromere satellite DNA) satellite and G-rich telomere repeats, respectively. However, the protein components are not fully understood. DNA-binding proteins associated with centromeric or telomeric DNAs will most likely be important for the understanding of centromere and telomere structure and functions. To capture DNA-specific binding proteins, affinity pull-down technique was applied in this study to isolate rice centromeric and telomeric DNA-binding proteins. Fifty-five proteins were identified for their binding affinity to rice CentO repeat, and 80 proteins were identified for their binding to telomere repeat. One CentO-binding protein, Os02g0288200, was demonstrated to bind to CentO specifically by in vitro assay. A conserved domain, DUF573 with unknown functions was identified in this protein, and proven to be responsible for the specific binding to CentO in vitro. Four proteins identified as telomere DNA-binding proteins in this study were reported by different groups previously. These results demonstrate that DNA affinity pull-down technique is effective in the isolation of sequence-specific binding proteins and will be applicable in future studies of centromere and telomere proteins.

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