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How can plant virus satellite RNAs alter the effects of plant virus infection? A study of the changes in the Nicotiana benthamiana proteome after infection by Peanut stunt virus in the presence or absence of its satellite RNA

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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Figs. 1 and 3 in colour.

Correspondence: Dr. Aleksandra Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Interdepartmental Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Institute of Plant Protection—National Research Institute, 20 Węgorka St, 60-318 Poznan, Poland

E-mail: ao.steplowska@iorpib.poznan.pl

Fax: +4861 8676301

Abstract

Peanut stunt virus (PSV), which belongs to the Cucumovirus genus, is a pathogen of legumes. Certain PSV strains associated with a satellite RNA (satRNA) modify the symptoms of infected plants and interfere with plant metabolism. We used PSV-P genomic transcripts (GTs) with and without PSV-P satRNA and a comparative proteomic 2D-DIGE/MS study to assess their effects on Nicotiana benthamiana infection. When the proteomes of the PSV-P genomic transcripts-infected (no satRNA present) and mock-inoculated plants were compared 29 differentially regulated proteins were found. When comparisons were made for plants infected with PSV-P-GT in the presence or absence of satRNA, and for mock-infected plants and those infected with the satRNA-associated PSV-P-GT, 40 and 60 such proteins, respectively, were found. The presence of satRNA mostly decreased the amounts of the affected host proteins. Proteins involved in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, for example ferredoxin-NADP-reductase and malate dehydrogenase, are among the identified affected proteins in all comparisons. Proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation were also affected. Such proteins include chaperonin 60β—whose abundance of the proteins changed for all comparisons—and aminopeptidase that is a satRNA- or PSV-P-GT/satRNA-responsive protein. Additionally, the levels of the stress-related proteins superoxide dismutase and acidic endochitinase Q increased in the PSV-P-GT- and PSV-P-GT/satRNA-infected plants. This study appears to be the first report on plant proteome changes in response to a satRNA presence during viral infection and, as such, may provide a reference for future studies concerning the influence of satRNAs during viral infections.

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