Plant proteins under oxidative attack

Authors

  • Silke Jacques,

    1. Department of Medical Protein Research, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    2. Department of Biochemistry, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    3. Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    4. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
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  • Bart Ghesquière,

    1. Department of Medical Protein Research, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    2. Department of Biochemistry, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
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  • Frank Van Breusegem,

    1. Department of Plant Systems Biology, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    2. Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
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  • Kris Gevaert

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biochemistry, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    • Department of Medical Protein Research, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
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Correspondence: Dr. Kris Gevaert, Department of Medical Protein Research and Biochemistry, VIB and Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, A. Baertsoenkaai 3, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium

E-mail: kris.gevaert@vib-ugent.be

Fax: +32-92649496

Abstract

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify various biomolecules, including proteins. The resulting protein modifications are highly diverse, can be reversible as well as irreversible, and might affect protein structure and function. Besides random modifications, targeted modifications at specific amino acids in surface-accessible protein regions occur. These changes are of particular interest as, e.g. by altering the local protein conformation; they might initiate specific (oxidative) signaling pathways. Here, we focus on two protein modifications that are found under conditions of oxidative stress in plants: oxidation of the sulfur-containing methionine and nitration of tyrosine. We review the functional consequences caused by the oxidation of several plant proteins and line-up those proteomics technologies that are amenable to study these selected modifications.

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