Mouse models of growth hormone action and aging: A proteomic perspective

Authors

  • Juan Ding,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Lucila Sackmann-Sala,

    1. Inserm Unit 845, Research Center Growth and Signaling, PRL/GH Pathophysiology Laboratory, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Faculty of Medicine, Necker Site, Paris, France
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  • John J. Kopchick

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA
    • Department of Ophthalmology, Schepens Eye Research Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Fig. 1 in colour.

Correspondence: Dr. John J. Kopchick, Edison Biotechnology Institute, Ohio University, 1 Water Tower Drive, The Ridges, Athens, OH 45701, USA

E-mail: kopchick@ohio.edu

Fax: +1-740-593-4795

Abstract

Growth hormone (GH) is a protein secreted by the anterior pituitary and circulates throughout the body to exert important actions on growth and metabolism. GH stimulates the secretion of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) that mediates some of the growth promoting actions of GH. The GH/IGF-I axis has recently been recognized as important in terms of longevity in organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mice. For example, GH transgenic mice possess short lifespans while GH receptor null (GHR‒/‒) mice have extended longevity. Thus, the actions of GH (or IGF-I) or lack thereof impact the aging process. In this review, we summarize the proteomic analyses of plasma and white adipose tissue in these two mouse models of GH action, i.e. GH transgenic and GHR‒/‒ mice. At the protein level, we wanted to establish novel plasma biomarkers of GH action as a function of age and to determine differences in adipose tissue depots. We have shown that these proteomic approaches have not only confirmed several known physiological actions of GH, but also resulted in novel protein biomarkers and targets that may be indicative of the aging process and/or new functions of GH. These results may generate new directions for GH and/or aging research.

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