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Identification and characterization of proteins isolated from microvesicles derived from human lung cancer pleural effusions

Authors

  • Jung Ok Park,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Do-Young Choi,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Dong-Sic Choi,

    1. Department of Life Science and Division of Molecular and Life Sciences, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Republic of Korea
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  • Hee Joung Kim,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jeong Won Kang,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jae Hun Jung,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jeong Hwa Lee,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Jayoung Kim,

    1. The Urological Diseases Research Center, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA
    2. Departments of Surgery and Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
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  • Michael R. Freeman,

    1. Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
    2. The Urological Diseases Research Center, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA
    3. Departments of Surgery and Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
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  • Kye Young Lee,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Yong Song Gho,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Life Science and Division of Molecular and Life Sciences, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Republic of Korea
    • Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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  • Kwang Pyo Kim

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Molecular Biotechnology, WCU Program, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
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Correspondence: Professor Kwang Pyo Kim, Institute of Biomedical Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143–701, Republic of Korea

E-mail: kpkim@konkuk.ac.kr

Fax: 82-2-450-3395

Additional corresponding authors: Professor Yong Song Gho, E-mail: ysgho@postech.ac.kr

Professor Kwang Pyo Kim, E-mail: kpkim@konkuk.ac.kr

Abstract

Microvesicles (MVs, also known as exosomes, ectosomes, microparticles) are released by various cancer cells, including lung, colorectal, and prostate carcinoma cells. MVs released from tumor cells and other sources accumulate in the circulation and in pleural effusion. Although recent studies have shown that MVs play multiple roles in tumor progression, the potential pathological roles of MV in pleural effusion, and their protein composition, are still unknown. In this study, we report the first global proteomic analysis of highly purified MVs derived from human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pleural effusion. Using nano-LC–MS/MS following 1D SDS-PAGE separation, we identified a total of 912 MV proteins with high confidence. Three independent experiments on three patients showed that MV proteins from PE were distinct from MV obtained from other malignancies. Bioinformatics analyses of the MS data identified pathologically relevant proteins and potential diagnostic makers for NSCLC, including lung-enriched surface antigens and proteins related to epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings provide new insight into the diverse functions of MVs in cancer progression and will aid in the development of novel diagnostic tools for NSCLC.

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