Investigation of stable and transient protein–protein interactions: Past, present, and future

Authors

  • Armand G. Ngounou Wetie,

    1. Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA
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  • Izabela Sokolowska,

    1. Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA
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  • Alisa G. Woods,

    1. Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA
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  • Urmi Roy,

    1. Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA
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  • Joseph A. Loo,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Biological Chemistry and Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, UCLA Molecular Biology Institute and UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, University of California–Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Costel C. Darie

    Corresponding author
    • Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY, USA
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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Figs. 1–4 in colour.

Correspondence: Dr. Costel C. Darie, Biochemistry & Proteomics Group, Department of Chemistry & Biomolecular Science, Clarkson University, 8 Clarkson Avenue, Potsdam, NY 13699-5810, USA

E-mail: cdarie@clarkson.edu

Fax: +1 315 268-6610

Additional corresponding author: Dr. Joseph A. Loo,

E-mail: jloo@chem.ucla.edu

Abstract

This article presents an overview of the literature and a review of recent advances in the analysis of stable and transient protein–protein interactions (PPIs) with a focus on their function within cells, organs, and organisms. The significance of PTMs within the PPIs is also discussed. We focus on methods to study PPIs and methods of detecting PPIs, with particular emphasis on electrophoresis-based and MS-based investigation of PPIs, including specific examples. The validation of PPIs is emphasized and the limitations of the current methods for studying stable and transient PPIs are discussed. Perspectives regarding PPIs, with focus on bioinformatics and transient PPIs are also provided.

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