Distributed computing and data storage in proteomics: Many hands make light work, and a stronger memory

Authors

  • Kenneth Verheggen,

    1. Department of Medical Protein Research, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    2. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Harald Barsnes,

    1. Proteomics Unit, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lennart Martens

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medical Protein Research, VIB, Ghent, Belgium
    2. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    • Correspondence: Professor Lennart Martens, Department of Medical Protein Research, Ghent University, Albert Baertsoenkaai 3, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium

      E-mail: lennart.martens@UGent.be

    Search for more papers by this author

  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Figs. 1 and 2 in colour.

Abstract

Modern day proteomics generates ever more complex data, causing the requirements on the storage and processing of such data to outgrow the capacity of most desktop computers. To cope with the increased computational demands, distributed architectures have gained substantial popularity in the recent years. In this review, we provide an overview of the current techniques for distributed computing, along with examples of how the techniques are currently being employed in the field of proteomics. We thus underline the benefits of distributed computing in proteomics, while also pointing out the potential issues and pitfalls involved.

Ancillary