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Rice proteomics: A model system for crop improvement and food security

Authors

  • Sun Tae Kim,

    1. Department of Plant Bioscience, Pusan National University, Miryang, South Korea
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  • Sang Gon Kim,

    1. Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea
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  • Ganesh Kumar Agrawal,

    1. Research Laboratory for Biotechnology and Biochemistry (RLABB), Kathmandu, Nepal
    2. GRADE Academy Private Limited, Birgunj, Nepal
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  • Shoshi Kikuchi,

    1. Plant Genome Research Unit, Agrogenomics Research Center, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (NIAS), Japan
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  • Randeep Rakwal

    Corresponding author
    1. Research Laboratory for Biotechnology and Biochemistry (RLABB), Kathmandu, Nepal
    2. GRADE Academy Private Limited, Birgunj, Nepal
    3. Organization for Educational Initiatives, University of Tsukuba, Japan
    4. Department of Anatomy I, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    • Correspondence: Professor Randeep Rakwal, Organization for Educational Initiatives, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba 305-8577, Ibaraki, Japan

      E-mail: plantproteomics@gmail.com

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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Figs. 1 and 4–8 in colour.

Abstract

Rice proteomics has progressed at a tremendous pace since the year 2000, and that has resulted in establishing and understanding the proteomes of tissues, organs, and organelles under both normal and abnormal (adverse) environmental conditions. Established proteomes have also helped in re-annotating the rice genome and revealing the new role of previously known proteins. The progress of rice proteomics had recognized it as the corner/stepping stone for at least cereal crops. Rice proteomics remains a model system for crops as per its exemplary proteomics research. Proteomics-based discoveries in rice are likely to be translated in improving crop plants and vice versa against ever-changing environmental factors. This review comprehensively covers rice proteomics studies from August 2010 to July 2013, with major focus on rice responses to diverse abiotic (drought, salt, oxidative, temperature, nutrient, hormone, metal ions, UV radiation, and ozone) as well as various biotic stresses, especially rice–pathogen interactions. The differentially regulated proteins in response to various abiotic stresses in different tissues have also been summarized, indicating key metabolic and regulatory pathways. We envision a significant role of rice proteomics in addressing the global ground level problem of food security, to meet the demands of the human population which is expected to reach six to nine billion by 2040.

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