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Perfluorocarbons: Life sciences and biomedical uses Dedicated to the memory of Professor Guy Ourisson, a true RENAISSANCE man.

Authors

  • Marie Pierre Krafft,

    Corresponding author
    1. Systèmes Organisés Fluorés à Finalités Thérapeutiques (SOFFT), Institut Charles Sadron (CNRS), 6 rue Boussingault., 6700 Strasbourg Cedex, France
    • Systèmes Organisés Fluorés à Finalités Thérapeutiques (SOFFT), Institut Charles Sadron (CNRS), 6 rue Boussingault., 6700 Strasbourg Cedex, France
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  • Jean G. Riess

    1. MRI Institute, University of California at San Diego, Medical Center, 410 Dickinson St, San Diego, California 92103-1990
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Abstract

Perfluorocarbons are primarily characterized by outstanding chemical and biological inertness, and intense hydrophobic and lipophobic effects. The latter effects provide a powerful noncovalent, labile binding interaction that can promote selective self- assembly. Perfluoro compounds do not mimic nature, yet they can offer abiotic building blocks for the de novo design of functional biopolymers and alternative solutions to physiologically vital issues. They offer new tags useful for molecular recognition, selective sorting, and templated binding (e.g., selective peptide and nucleic acid pairing). They also stabilize membranes and provide micro- and nanocompartmented fluorous environments. Perfluorocarbons provide inert, apolar carrier fluids for lab-on-a-chip experiments and assays using microfluidic technologies. Low water solubility, combined with high vapor pressure, allows stabilization of injectable microbubbles that serve as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound imaging. High gas solubilities are the basis for an abiotic means for intravascular oxygen delivery. Other biomedical applications of fluorocarbons include lung surfactant replacement and ophthalmologic aids. Diverse colloids with fluorocarbon phases and/or shells are being investigated for molecular imaging using ultrasound or magnetic resonance, and for targeted drug delivery. Highly fluorinated polymers provide a range of inert materials (e.g., fluorosilicons, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) for contact lenses, reconstructive surgery (e.g., vascular grafts), and other devices. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part A: Polym Chem 45: 1185–1198, 2007.

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