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Biocompatible and degradable nanogels via oxidation reactions of synthetic thiomers in inverse miniemulsion

Authors

  • Juergen Groll,

    Corresponding author
    1. DWI e.V. and Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 8, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
    • DWI e.V. and Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 8, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
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  • Smriti Singh,

    1. DWI e.V. and Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 8, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
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  • Krystyna Albrecht,

    1. DWI e.V. and Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 8, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
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  • Martin Moeller

    1. DWI e.V. and Institute of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstr. 8, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
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Abstract

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We present the preparation of degradable and biocompatible nanohydrogels from thiol-functional macromers. Linear poly(glycidol) and star-shaped poly(ethylene oxide-stat-propylene oxide) with molecular weights below 15 kDa were functionalized with thiol groups by polymer-analogous reaction and crosslinked in inverse miniemulsion. Particle size was determined by dynamic light scattering, cryo-field emission scanning electron microscopy and scanning force microscopy. The disulfide crosslinked particles readily degrade on addition of 10 mM aqueous glutathione solution what resembles cytosolic conditions. Biocompatibility has been proven by incubation of L929 fibroblasts with nanogels for 24 and 72 h followed by life-dead staining. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at www.interscience.wiley.com.]

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