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Triptycene-containing polyetherolefins via acyclic diene metathesis polymerization

Authors

  • Stefanie A. Sydlik,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Paula A. Delgado,

    1. Department of Chemistry, The George and Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611
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  • Sotaro Inomata,

    1. Department of Chemistry, The George and Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611
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  • Brett VanVeller,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Yong Yang,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Timothy M. Swager,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
    • Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
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  • Kenneth B. Wagener

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, The George and Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611
    • Department of Chemistry, The George and Josephine Butler Polymer Research Laboratory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611
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Abstract

Several new triptycene-containing polyetherolefins were synthesized via acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) polymerization. The well-established mechanism, high selectivity and specificity, mild reaction conditions, and well-defined end-groups make the ADMET polymerization a good choice for studying systematic variations in polymer structure. Two types of triptycene-based monomer with varying connectivities were used in the synthesis of homopolymers, block copolymers, and random copolymers. In this way, the influence of the triptycene architecture and concentration in the polymer backbone on the thermal behavior of the polymers was studied. Inclusion of increasing amounts of triptycene were found to increase the glass transition temperature, from −44 °C in polyoctenamer to 59 °C in one of the hydrogenated triptycene homopolymers (H-PT2). Varying the amounts and orientations of triptycene was found to increase the stiffness (H-PT1), toughness (PT11-b-PO1) and ductility (PT11-ran-PO3) of the polymer at room temperature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part A: Polym Chem, 2013

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