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Thermal behavior and intermolecular interactions in blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and maleated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) with chitosan

Authors

  • Cheng Chen,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, People's Republic of China
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  • Xuesong Zhou,

    1. Laboratory of Cellulose and Lignocellulosic Chemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650, People's Republic of China
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  • Yugang Zhuang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, People's Republic of China
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  • Lisong Dong

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, People's Republic of China
    • State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022, People's Republic of China
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Abstract

The thermal behavior and intermolecular interactions of blends of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and maleated PHB with chitosan were studied with differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The differences in the two blend systems with respect to their thermal behavior and intermolecular interactions were investigated. The melting temperatures, melting enthalpies, and crystallinities of the two blend systems gradually decreased as the chitosan content in the blends increased. Compared with that of the PHB component with the same composition, the crystallization of the maleated PHB component was more intensively suppressed by the chitosan component in the blends because of the rigid chitosan molecular chains and the intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the components. FTIR, WAXD, and XPS showed that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the blends were caused by the carbonyls of PHB or maleated PHB and chitosan aminos, and their existence depended on the compositions of the blends. The introduction of maleic anhydride groups onto PHB chains promoted intermolecular interactions between the maleated PHB and chitosan components. In addition, the intermolecular interactions disturbed the original crystal structures of the PHB, maleated PHB, and chitosan components; this was further proven by WAXD results. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys 43: 35–47, 2005

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