Electrospinning of poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/clay nanocomposite fibers

Authors

  • Ying Liu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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  • Chunhua Li,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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  • Shuang Chen,

    1. Chemical and Molecular Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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  • Ellen Wachtel,

    1. Chemical Services Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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  • Tadanori Koga,

    1. Chemical and Molecular Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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  • Jonathan C. Sokolov,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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  • Miriam. H. Rafailovich

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
    2. Chemical and Molecular Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275
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Abstract

Poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/clay nanocomposite fibers were fabricated using electrospinning. The fiber diameters were controlled by varying the polymer/chloroform concentration, which resulted in fibers with diameters ranging from 1 to 15 μm. The clay concentration was varied from 0.35 to 6.6 wt %. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the fiber diameter increased with increasing clay concentration, whereas beading decreased. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a disruption of the spherulite structures by clay, which is consistent with heterogeneous nucleation. Shear modulus force microscopy indicated a reduction in melting point (Tm) with decreasing diameter for fibers thinner than 15 μm, which was confirmed by temperature dependent X-ray diffraction data. For fibers thinner than 8 μm, the presence of clay further enhanced the reduction of Tm. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys 47: 2501–2508, 2009

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