Polymers for neural implants

Authors

  • Christina Hassler,

    1. Laboratory for Biomedical Microtechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering-IMTEK, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 102, Freiburg, Germany
    2. Bernstein Center Freiburg, Hansastr. 9A, Freiburg, Germany
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    • C. Hassler and T. Boretius contributed equally to this work.

  • Tim Boretius,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Biomedical Microtechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering-IMTEK, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 102, Freiburg, Germany
    • Department of Microsystems Engineering, Laboratory for Biomedical Microtechnology, IMTE
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    • C. Hassler and T. Boretius contributed equally to this work.

  • Thomas Stieglitz

    1. Laboratory for Biomedical Microtechnology, Department of Microsystems Engineering-IMTEK, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 102, Freiburg, Germany
    2. Bernstein Center Freiburg, Hansastr. 9A, Freiburg, Germany
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum: Polymers for neural implants Volume 49, Issue 3, 255, Article first published online: 30 December 2010

Abstract

Neural implants are technical systems that restore sensory or motor functions after injury and modulate neural behavior in neuronal diseases. Neural interfaces or prostheses have lead to new therapeutic options and rehabilitation approaches in the last 40 years. The interface between the nervous tissue and the technical material is the place that determines success or failure of the neural implant. Recording of nerve signals and stimulation of nerve cells take place at this neuro-technical interface. Polymers are the most common material class for substrate and insulation materials in combination with metals for interconnection wires and electrode sites. This work focuses on the neuro-technical interface and summarizes its fundamental specifications first. The most common polymer materials are presented and described in detail. We conclude with an overview of the different applications and their specific designs with the accompanying manufacturing processes from precision mechanics, laser structuring and micromachining that are introduced in either the peripheral or central nervous system. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys, 2010

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