Organic transistors in the new decade: Toward n-channel, printed, and stabilized devices

Authors

  • Srinivas Kola,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
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    • Srinivas Kola and Jasmine Sinha contributed equally to this work.

  • Jasmine Sinha,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
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    • Srinivas Kola and Jasmine Sinha contributed equally to this work.

  • Howard E. Katz

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
    2. Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 206 Maryland Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
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Abstract

Significant progress has been made in designing organic semiconducting materials (OSCs) for the past few decades for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). Much attention has been paid to the development of p-channel OSCs, with less but highly significant progress on n-channel OSCs. In this review, we focus on the advances made with OFETs in the last few years to achieve high performance in n-channel modes, air stability, and solution processability, leading to printable active electronics. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys, 2012

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