Strain rate and temperature dependence of a nanoparticle-filled poly(dimethylsiloxane) undergoing shear deformation

Authors

  • Lei Yan,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, People's Republic of China
    2. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
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  • David A. Dillard,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
    • School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, People's Republic of China
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  • Robert L. West,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061
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  • Kenneth J. Rubis,

    1. Dow Corning Corporation, 2200 W. Salzburg Road, P.O. Box 994, Midland, Michigan 48686-0994
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  • Glenn V. Gordon

    1. Dow Corning Corporation, 2200 W. Salzburg Road, P.O. Box 994, Midland, Michigan 48686-0994
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Abstract

The mechanical properties in shear of unfilled and nanoparticle-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks are reported. The effect of silicate-based nanoparticles on the mechanical response was studied as functions of rate and temperature using the time–temperature superposition principle. An apparent yielding phenomenon was observed in the filled polymer in spite of the more typical elastomeric behavior exhibited by the pure PDMS network. The time–temperature superposition principle was applied to capture the shear strain rate (10−4–10−1 s−1) and temperature (−40 to 60°C) dependence of the stress response of the filled PDMS at different strains and at the yield point. A power-law relationship was found to adequately describe the resulting master curves for yield stress in shear. Using a triangular shear displacement profile at 10−2 s−1, the effect of temperature (−20 to 80°C) on the recovery from a particularly pronounced Mullins effect was investigated as a function of rest time. Given adequate rest time (between 10 and 102 min), recovery was observed for the temperature range studied. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Polym Sci Part B: Polym Phys, 2012

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