Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 11

1 June 2011

Volume 49, Issue 11

Pages i–ii, 757–825

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 49, Issue 11 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22268

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      Polyethylenes, in common with most polymers, exhibit different mechanical properties depending on their structure; for instance, polyethylene nanofibers can have ultrahigh strength. This makes simple methods to control structure during polymer preparation particularly valuable. On page 812 of this issue, Zhang Hu and colleagues use metallocene catalysts supported on titania nanotubes, coupled with controlled polymerization conditions, to create polyethylene structures such as nanofibers, nanosheets, and floccules. They elucidate the correlation between preparation conditions and resulting structure, and look at how these conditions also control chain morphology at a molecular level.

  2. Reviews

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    3. Reviews
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      Natural underwater adhesives (pages 757–771)

      Russell J. Stewart, Todd C. Ransom and Vladimir Hlady

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22256

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      Effective underwater bonding requires robust interfacial adhesion to wet native surfaces with little surface preparation, deposition of the adhesive onto sites submerged in water, and controlled solidification after deposition for cohesive strength. Aquatic organisms achieve these aims with a complex variety of mechanisms and exquisite control of electrostatic interactions, assembly, and kinetics, amongst other things. Here, the approaches are reviewed, with a view to how we can use the understanding for synthetic adhesives.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
    1. Effect of aluminum deposition and annealing on polymer-based solar cell performance (pages 772–780)

      Brett W. Guralnick, Jonathan E. Seppala and Michael E. Mackay

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22245

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      Fast deposition of aluminum on the active layer of a polymer-based solar cell produces craters while slow deposition does not and significantly reduces the device efficiency. The craters and differences in device efficiency are eliminated if the device is annealed before deposition. However, if the device is annealed with the aluminum electrode in place then a buckling instability results that reduces the efficiency and remarkably increases the fill factor.

    2. Tuning the mechanical properties in model nanocomposites: Influence of the polymer-filler interfacial interactions (pages 781–791)

      Chloé Chevigny, Nicolas Jouault, Florent Dalmas, François Boué and Jacques Jestin

      Version of Record online: 1 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22246

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      The effect of polymer/filler interfacial interaction on mechanical properties has been investigated on ungrafted and PS-grafted silica nanocomposites presenting similar filler dispersion. Below filler connectivity, reinforcement is similar for both systems and thus independent of polymer-filler interface state. When direct silica connectivity occurs, the grafted polymer layer yields a soft network between particles decreasing the strength of the connectivity. These results suggest that the reinforcement is clearly modulated by the strength of the filler-filler interaction.

    3. Polypyrrole–polyvinyl alcohol stable nanodispersion: A prospective conducting black ink (pages 792–800)

      Rupali Gangopadhyay and Mijanur Rahaman Molla

      Version of Record online: 11 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22216

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      Polypyrrole and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) together form a black, highly stable aqueous dispersion able to produce flexible, uniform and conducting films when printed and on glass and metal surfaces. As the nanodispersion retains crosslinking on standing, the ink does not dissolve even after complete drying, making this material a promising candidate as conducting ink for inkjet printers.

    4. Composition effects of thermoplastic segmented polyurethanes on their nanostructuring kinetics with or without preshear (pages 801–811)

      Elise Mourier, Laurent David, Pierre Alcouffe, Cyrille Rochas, Françoise Méchin and René Fulchiron

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22251

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      Thermoplastic segmented polyurethanes (TPUs) are composed of discrete hard domains dispersed in a soft matrix, resulting in both elastomeric and thermoplastic behaviors. With such a tunable structure, these polymers offer unique possibilities for the creation of new tailor-made materials. Here, in-situ SAXS is used to clarify the effect of the composition and nature of hard and soft segments on the nanostructuring kinetics of TPUs and how shear, which can occur during processing, can affect the material morphology.

    5. TiO2 nanotube supported metallocene catalysts for the preparation of nanofiber, nanosheet, and floccule of polyethylene (pages 812–817)

      Zhang Hu, Chengbin Liu, Yulin Wu, Ronghua Liu, Yejuan He and Shenglian Luo

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22252

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      Polyethylenes with specific structures can exhibit specific mechanical properties, such as nanofibers with ultrahigh strength for example. Here, ethylene polymerization is controlled using titania-nanotube-supported metallocene catalysts. Specific morphologies of the polyethylene, like nanofibers, floccules and nanosheets, are obtained by tuning the polymerization conditions. This catalytic approach represents a novel and easy way to control the structure of polymer materials during their preparation.

    6. The influence of the polymer chain stiffness on tracer diffusion in polymeric matrices (pages 818–825)

      Hyun Tae Jung, Bong June Sung and Arun Yethiraj

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22253

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      The dynamics of tracers in polymeric matrices is critical for applications as fuel cells and separation membranes, and matrix morphology has a significant effect. Experimental results alone have failed to provide a consensus on the magnitude and direction of the various factors. Computer simulations are here used to unveil the role of the chain stiffness in the diffusion of a tracer in the matrix, showing that the effect of stiffness is governed primarily by the local relaxation of the polymer chains rather than the average structure of the matrix.

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