Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 13

1 July 2011

Volume 49, Issue 13

Pages i–ii, 909–977

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    3. Reviews
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      Cover Image, Volume 49, Issue 13 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22291

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      The vast majority of high-mobility organic semiconductors appear to be crystalline or at least semicrystalline, and grain boundaries between crystalline domains drastically affect charge transport in devices. Despite the acknowledged importance of domain structure and grain boundaries, until recently few experimental studies have been employed to examine their nature. On page 909 of this issue, Christopher McNeill reviews the last five years of progress with the range of diverse experimental approaches that have been used to image domain orientation and molecular order in organic semiconductor films, including optical, soft X-ray, electron and scanning-probe microscopies. These approaches are beginning to provide detailed information about the nature of sub-micron domain structure, and facilitating direct correlation with charge-transport physics.

  2. Reviews

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    3. Reviews
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      Imaging the domain structure of organic semiconductor films (pages 909–919)

      Christopher R. McNeill

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22270

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      Understanding of domain structure of polycrystalline organic semiconductor films is crucial for advancing insight into structure/function relationships in this important class of material, for fundamental research and applications alike. This article reviews important developments in recent years in the application of a range of experimental techniques for the local mapping of molecular orientation and order in both small molecule and conjugated polymer films. Opportunities for future development in this area are also discussed.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
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    1. A coarse-grained molecular model of strain-hardening for polymers in the marginally glassy state (pages 920–938)

      Kapileswar Nayak, Daniel J. Read, Tom C. B. McLeish, Peter J. Hine and Manlio Tassieri

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22263

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      When glassy polymeric materials are subjected to large deformation in the solid state, their response is influenced by prior processing of the material, specifically the flow and temperature history. This article reports a computational algorithm designed to investigate the relationship between melt-state processing and solid-state deformation, by modelling the polymer chain motion. This algorithm is able to match the results of controlled deformation/annealing experiments on polystyrene samples, and examine the corresponding chain dynamics.

    2. Chiral Azo polyurethane(urea): Preparation, optical properties and low power consumption polymeric thermo-optic switch (pages 939–948)

      Jinhua Liu, Fengxian Qiu, Guorong Cao, Yijun Guan, Qiang Shen, Dongya Yang and Qing Guo

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22266

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      Polymer-based waveguide optical switches based on thermo-optic control attract great interest due to flexibility and simplicity of fabrication and modulation. Noncentrosymmetric packing is often required in polymer optical materials. This can be achieved by taking advantage of the inherent central asymmetry of polymers containing chiral units. Based on this concept a new polymeric Y-branched thermo-optic switch, with low-power consumption and fast response time, is proposed and realized.

    3. Separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes with aromatic group functionalized polymethacrylates and building blocks contribution to the enrichment (pages 949–960)

      Xiaoyong Pan and Mary B. Chan-Park

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22265

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      Polymethacrylates with different pendant aromatic functional groups are used for carbon nanotube separation. Regardless of the chemical nature of the attached functional group, all polymers preferentially disperse smaller diameter nanotube species. However, the side aromatic groups are found to play essential role in determining the metallicity selectivity of the polymers and can be used to separate metallic, semi-conducting, and nonmetallic nanotubes in solution.

    4. Entanglement properties of cellulose and amylose in an ionic liquid (pages 961–965)

      Jun-ichi Horinaka, Ryosuke Yasuda and Toshikazu Takigawa

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22262

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      The molecular weight between entanglements (Me) determines the number of entanglements occurring along a polymer chain, and especially in the molten state is regarded as a material constant that reflecting the chain properties. In the case of cellulose and amylose, Me is quite different despite both of these polysaccharides being composed of the same D-glucose units. Their different bonding types and secondary chain conformations can explain such a remarkable difference.

    5. Equilibrium statistics of weakly slip-linked Gaussian polymer chains (pages 966–977)

      Takashi Uneyama and Kazushi Horio

      Article first published online: 16 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22267

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      Entanglement has a large effect on the dynamic properties of polymer chains in melts and solutions. The slip-link model, which represents entanglements as linking points that can slide along the chains, is a popular tool to model rheological properties of entangled systems. However, under certain conditions the model can cause effective attraction between chains, leading to their unphysical aggregation. As shown here, this artifact can be corrected by introducing repulsive interactions between the monomers or chains.

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