Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 16

15 August 2011

Volume 49, Issue 16

Pages i–ii, 1131–1202

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 49, Issue 16 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 18 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22315

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      As a greater understanding of the parameters that affect the performance of polymer solar cells develops and reveals the strong role played by the morphology of the constituents, greater control is desired. The self-assembled structures of block copolymers are relatively easily controlled, providing an ideal opportunity for a high level of manipulation of the polymers' morphology. On page 1131 of this issue, Paul Topham, Andrew Parnell and Roger Hiorns review progress in this area to date, with a focus on the current drawbacks to block copolymers' use in solar cells and potential solutions to these problems.

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Block copolymer strategies for solar cell technology (pages 1131–1156)

      Paul D. Topham, Andrew J. Parnell and Roger C. Hiorns

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22302

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      As polymer solar cells attract more attention in both research and commercial spheres, greater control over polymer morphology is desired. This review covers various strategies used to incorporate block copolymers into organic photovoltaic devices. Block copolymers exhibit extraordinary properties that collide perfectly with the needs of organic photovoltaics. Pitfalls are discussed in the light of current progress alongside possible solutions for future global implementation.

  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Development of internal fine structure in stretched rubber vulcanizates (pages 1157–1162)

      Masatoshi Tosaka, Shigeyuki Toki, Justin Che, Lixia Rong and Benjamin S. Hsiao

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22290

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      Vulcanized rubber is ubiquitous in industry because of its high extensibility and toughness. However, the internal fine structure at the origin of such outstanding mechanical properties is yet to be identified. Using SAXS is it possible to follow the development of the fine structure in stretched rubber samples as a function of tensile stress. The results indicate the formation of structures elongated in the stretching growth direction but not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    1. Influence of nanoparticle surface chemistry on the thermomechanical and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic nanocomposites (pages 1163–1172)

      Edwin De La Cruz-Montoya and Carlos Rinaldi

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22294

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      The effect of surface chemistry of magnetic nanofillers on thermal, mechanical, and magnetic properties of nanocomposites was studied by comparing particles coated with oleic acid and an acrylate-containing silane dispersed in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix. The nanoparticles modified with the acrylate-containing silane were found to be better dispersed within the nanocomposite polymer matrix and resulted in improved thermomechanical properties.

    2. A new conduction phenomenon observed in polyethylene and epoxy resin: Ultra-fast soliton conduction (pages 1173–1182)

      G. C. Montanari, D. Fabiani and L. A. Dissado

      Version of Record online: 23 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22296

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      A new mechanism of charge transport is found in insulating polymers. This involves charge pulses that can move quickly across the insulation in comparison to the charge carrier mobility typical of such materials. Such pulses travel in the form of solitary waves (solitons), a transport mechanism so far unsuspected in insulating materials.

    3. Molecular dynamics simulations of the effects of carbon dioxide on the interfacial bonding of polystyrene thin films (pages 1183–1194)

      Coleman Alleman, Anand Srivastava and Somnath Ghosh

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22288

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      In this study, molecular dynamics simulations examine the atomic scale behavior of polystyrene thin films to develop a detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the film bonding process and quantify the impact of carbon dioxide on material behavior, especially at the interface.

    4. Comparison of the transient stress–strain response of rubber to its linear dynamic behavior (pages 1195–1202)

      Peter H. Mott, Jeffrey N. Twigg, C. Michael Roland, Kenneth E. Nugent, Terry E. Hogan and Christopher G. Robertson

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22292

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      Linear dynamic and transient mechanical data are compared over strain rates 10−4–103 s−1 for three rubbers, 1,4- and 1,2-polybutadienes, and a styrene–butadiene copolymer (glass transition temperatures −93.0, 0.5, and 4.1 °C). The strain and strain rate effects were decoupled for the 1,4-polybutadiene, but segmental dynamics precluded separation of these effects for the other two rubbers. Thus, using linear dynamic data to predict stresses and other mechanical properties at higher strain rates entails large error.

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