Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 3

1 February 2011

Volume 49, Issue 3

Pages 173–255

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Progress Reports
    4. Communications
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    6. Articles
    7. Full Papers
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    9. Erratum
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      Cover Image, Volume 49, Issue 3 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22220

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      Inspired by examples from nature such as the hierarchical features on a gecko's foot, topological patterns have been used on the surfaces of many synthetic materials to control adhesion. It has been shown that such patterns either increase or decrease adhesion compared to that of the smooth surfaces, but most studies so far have looked at planar surfaces. On page 179 of this issue, Santanu Kundu and colleagues study the effect of surface wrinkles on a spherical surface on adhesion and develop a model to describe their findings. Compared to planar surfaces, where adhesion is determined by the total length of the contact line, they find that adhesion of non-planar wrinkled surfaces depends on the cumulative effect of the radius of curvature of the curved surface, and the wavelength and the amplitude of the wrinkles.

  2. Progress Reports

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      Stimuli-responsive polymers in the 21st century: Elaborated architecture to achieve high sensitivity, fast response, and robust behavior (pages 173–178)

      Harald Kirsebom, Igor Yu. Galaev and Bo Mattiasson

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22187

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      Stimuli-responsive polymers are capable of dramatically changing their conformation and properties in response to a stimulus, such as temperature or light irradiation. Despite their huge potential commercial applications only a few have made it all the way to the market. This progress report examines the main remaining challenges and opportunities to make stimuli-responsive polymers a commercial success story.

  3. Communications

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    3. Progress Reports
    4. Communications
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    1. Adhesion of nonplanar wrinkled surfaces (pages 179–185)

      Santanu Kundu, Chelsea S. Davis, Thomas Long, Ravi Sharma and Alfred J. Crosby

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22181

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      Topological patterns on polymer surfaces can significantly alter and control adhesion. Here, the effect of surface wrinkles with varying amplitude and wavelength on a spherical cross-linked polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surface on adhesion has been studied. The results display a transition from enhancement of adhesion to decrease depending upon wrinkle dimensions. A simple phenomenological model is proposed that describes the change of adhesion behavior as a function of wrinkle morphology.

  4. Full Paper

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    2. Cover Image
    3. Progress Reports
    4. Communications
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    9. Erratum
    1. Optical characterization of pristine poly(3-hexyl thiophene) films (pages 186–194)

      Anthony J. Morfa, Teresa M. Barnes, Andrew J. Ferguson, Dean H. Levi, Garry Rumbles, Kathy L. Rowlen and Jao van de Lagemaat

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22183

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      A better understanding the optical properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) will enable the optimization of polymer solar cell structures and blends. Here, anisotropic optical modeling of P3HT allows a robust model to be developed, paving the way for the use of the model on solar cell blends like P3HT/fullerene. The differences between modeling P3HT films with both isotropic and anisotropic models are presented as well as the inferred electronic structure.

  5. Articles

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    1. Modeling differential scanning calorimetry melting curves of ethylene/α-olefin copolymers (pages 195–205)

      Yury V. Kissin

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22164

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      Although the sequence length distribution in copolymers can be easily calculated from statistics, crystallization mechanisms of monomer sequences of varying lengths are not known, making modeling of their differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) melting curves difficult. A procedure is developed for modeling the melting behavior of linear copolymers. This allows both the correct description of the shapes of DSC melting curves and an estimation of relative amounts of crystallizable material in different components of complex copolymer mixtures.

  6. Full Papers

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    1. Thickness and annealing temperature effects on the optical properties and surface morphology of layer-by-layer poly(p-phenyline vinylene)+dodecylbenzenesulfonate films (pages 206–213)

      Eralci Moreira Therézio, Erick Piovesan, Maria Letícia Vega, Raigna A. Silva, Osvaldo N. Oliveira and Alexandre Marletta

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22180

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      The production of organic devices with controlled molecular architectures is essential to realize their potential as commercial products. Polymers are here deposited using a simple and low-cost layer-by-layer processing technique to obtain anisotropic thin films and nanostructured surfaces with polarized light emission that can be used as backlight in displays, light source in photonic crystals or waveguides for information technology.

  7. Full Paper

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    9. Erratum
    1. Relaxation of shish-kebab precursor in isotactic polystyrene after short-term shear flow (pages 214–221)

      Yunfeng Zhao, Go Matsuba, Koji Nishida, Tetsuaki Fujiwara, Rintaro Inoue, Inga Polec, Cong Deng and Toshiji Kanaya

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22176

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      When semi-crystalline polymers are crystallized under shear or elongational flow, socalled shish-kebab structures are formed. This structure is of particular interest because it is believed that it is a structural feature of ultra-high modulus and ultra-high strength fibers. A study of the formation process of shish-kebab structures in isotactic polystyrene shows that they emerge from string-like precursors, the formation of which is possible because of the high melting temperature of the crystals under shear flow.

    2. Thermal properties and influence of orientation on crystalline morphologies in stereoblock polypropylene and related elastomers (pages 222–243)

      Bryan B. Sauer, William G. Kampert, R. Scott Mclean and Raisa Monteiro

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22163

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      Small-angle neutron scattering and optical microscopy are used to investigate the selfassembling behavior of multiblock copolymers in solution. This approach allows the observation of self-assembly of macro-aggregates arranged in a hierarchical organization from nanometers to tens of micrometers. Such self-assembling copolymers are efficient at reducing the size of wax crystals and thus can be used as alternatives to lubricating oils in the oil industry.

    3. Polypropylene nanocomposites with various functionalized-multiwalled nanotubes: thermomechanical properties, morphology, gas permeation, and optical transparency (pages 244–254)

      Jeong-Ho Ko, Choon Sup Yoon and Jin-Hae Chang

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22173

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      The molecules with which carbon nanotubes are functionalized can have a significant effect on how well they can be dispersed within a polymer matrix, which is, in turn, expected to change the polymer—nanotube composite properties. Here, the properties of three polypropylene composites that use differently functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes were compared. Improvements in properties over pure polypropylene were seen in all cases, and surprisingly, no effects due to hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular interactions were found when amide groups were included.

  8. Erratum

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      Erratum: Polymers for neural implants (page 255)

      Christina Hassler, Tim Boretius and Thomas Stieglitz

      Article first published online: 30 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22189

      This article corrects:

      Polymers for neural implants

      Vol. 49, Issue 1, 18–33, Article first published online: 23 NOV 2010

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