Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 49 Issue 1

1 January 2011

Volume 49, Issue 1

Pages 1–87

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 49, Issue 1 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows wrinkles on a surface-wrinkled adhesive that develop when it interfaces with a gelatin-based hydrogel. The material enables a moisture-controlled adhesion mechanism because of the dynamic changes in morphology that occur when the surface-wrinkled adhesive is exposed to water. These morphology changes alter the crack-pinning behavior as the wrinkled surface debonds from a substrate, controlling the adhesion. The approach is expected to be of use in biomedical applications, where adhesives need to work with moist and compliant materials such as soft tissues. Read the full story from Edwin Chan, Jeffrey Karp and Robert Langer on page 40 of this issue.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
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      Polymer physics for the 21st century (page 1)

      Vicki Cleave

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22171

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
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      Progress in low-loss and high-bandwidth plastic optical fibers (pages 2–17)

      Yasuhiro Koike and Kotaro Koike

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22170

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      Polymer optical fibers (POFs) have long been overshadowed by the glass optical fibers (GOFs) that have been used to connect the world. Thanks to continuous technical innovations, however, the performance and usage of POFs has gradually and steadily improved. This review traces the history of POF development across the last half century focusing on loss reduction and bandwidth enhancement, and highlights how POFs are no longer just alternatives to GOFs, given their clear advantages for short-range networks.

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      Polymers for neural implants (pages 18–33)

      Christina Hassler, Tim Boretius and Thomas Stieglitz

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22169

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      Neural implants interface an electronic device with the peripheral or central nervous systems to treat neurological disorders or to restore lost sensory or motor functions. Polymers are the material of choice for insulation, encapsulation and substrate materials for these implants, which have to stay stable over decades in the human body. The review gives an overview of the most common polymer materials and their applications in the emerging field of neural engineering. Photograph by B. Müller

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum: Polymers for neural implants

      Vol. 49, Issue 3, 255, Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2010

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Optimization of organic electrochemical transistors for sensor applications (pages 34–39)

      Omid Yaghmazadeh, Fabio Cicoira, Daniel A. Bernards, Sang Y. Yang, Yvan Bonnassieux and George G. Malliaras

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22129

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      Polymer electrochemical transistors make ideal candidates for chemical and biological sensing thanks to their low-cost and compatibility with aqueous environments. Numerical modeling shows the ideal device geometries and polymer properties for sensing either ionic currents or electrochemical reactions. The results can be used to produce optimized electrochemical transistors for sensing applications such as medical diagnostics and environmental monitoring.

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      A “self-pinning” adhesive based on responsive surface wrinkles (pages 40–44)

      Edwin P. Chan, Jeffrey M. Karp and Robert S. Langer

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stimuli-responsive materials with dynamically changeable surface wrinkle patterns can be used to tune adhesion. Here a moisture-responsive surface-wrinkled adhesive is bonded to a hydrogel. Changes in surface morphology on exposure to water modify crack pinning as the wrinkles debond from the hydrogel surface, tailoring adhesion. This mechanism could inspire alternative approaches to develop biomedical tape-based adhesives, which need to work with hydrated, compliant hydrogel-like materials such as soft tissues.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Effect of multiple adduct fullerenes on charge generation and transport in photovoltaic blends with poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (pages 45–51)

      Mark A. Faist, Panagiotis E. Keivanidis, Samuel Foster, Paul H. Wöbkenberg, Thomas D. Anthopoulos, Donal D. C. Bradley, James R. Durrant and Jenny Nelson

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22125

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      Polymer-fullerene cells have a promising future for low-cost power generation. A significant difference in the performance of such cells is found when the number of substituents on the fullerene molecules is increased, even though charge-generation efficiency remains constant. Differences in the device performance are found to be due to changes in morphology, network formation and electron mobility

    2. Stimulated emission and ultrafast optical switching in a ter(9,9′-spirobifluorene)-co-methylmethacrylate copolymer (pages 52–61)

      Ana Charas, A. Luísa Mendonça, Jenny Clark, Luca Bazzana, Alessandro Nocivelli, Guglielmo Lanzani and Jorge Morgado

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22143

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      Optically active additives can be included in polymer optical fibers to enable signal amplification and in-fiber data processing. Spirobifluorene and methylmethacrylate moieties combined in a copolymer produce a material with good thermal and optical stability. Coupled with a strong stimulated emission band and optically controlled gain with potential switching rates into the terahertz, the copolymer is a promising candidate for data communications.

    3. High speeds complementary integrated circuits fabricated with all-printed polymeric semiconductors (pages 62–67)

      Kang-Jun Baeg, Dongyoon Khim, Dong-Yu Kim, Soon-Won Jung, Jae Bon Koo, In-Kyu You, Henry Yan, Antonio Facchetti and Yong-Young Noh

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22148

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      For high-throughput, large-scale production of organic electronics, inkjet printing is likely to be a key manufacturing method; however, it can prove problematic for semiconducting polymers that have longer chain lengths. By combining a new hole-transporting polymer with an existing electron-transporting one, not only is good printed transistor performance be achieved, but more complex complementary circuits are also demonstrated. In addition, clear correlations between solvents, polymer morphology and transistor performance are uncovered.

    4. The crystal–crystal transition in hydrogenated ring-opened polynorbornenes: Tacticity, crystal thickening, and alignment (pages 68–79)

      John P. Bishop and Richard A. Register

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22124

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      Control of polymer crystallization is crucial to creating materials with desired properties. The crystallization behavior of polynorbornenes is found to be dependent on their tacticity, with a rotationally disordered crystal phase stabilized over a wider temperature range by the incorporation of a higher number of racemo dyads. Polymer chains are highly mobile in the rotationally disordered crystal phase, enabling rapid thickening of crystals and solid-state processing.

    5. Optical biosensors based on integrated polymer light source and polymer photodiode (pages 80–87)

      Marc Ramuz, David Leuenberger and Lukas Bürgi

      Version of Record online: 21 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22111

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      An integrated biosensor-on-a-chip for low-cost and compact sensing of biomolecules demonstrates the power of polymer optoelectronics. A polymer light-emitting diode light source and a polymer photodiode array mini-spectrometer are integrated on a single chip only millimeters across. With 5 nm spectral resolution possible, detection of concentration levels as low as 333 nanomolar of mouse immunoglobin can be achieved without prior labeling of the molecules.

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