Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 1

1 January 2012

Volume 50, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–82

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 50, Issue 1 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      With the emerging demand for flexible electronic devices, there is currently intensive research on organic conductive materials. Ionic liquid-polymer gels can combine high ionic conductivity and good transparency with mechanical flexibility. A new solventfree process for the fabrication of inkjet printed ionic liquid-polymer gel microstructures with high resolution is presented by Ute Löffelmann, Nan Wang, Dario Mager, Patrick J. Smith, and Jan G. Korvink on page 38 of this issue. Gel properties can be controlled by choosing different types and amounts of ionic liquids and monomers. The microscope image on the cover and left shows a structure created on the gel surface when it is detached from a glass slide.

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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      Polymer science that makes a difference (page 1)

      Vicki Cleave

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22386

  3. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Magnetic field alignment of block copolymers and polymer nanocomposites: Scalable microstructure control in functional soft materials (pages 2–8)

      Pawel W. Majewski, Manesh Gopinadhan and Chinedum O. Osuji

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22382

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      Alignment of block copolymer microdomains and polymer nanocomposites in mechanically robust films on large length scales (1 mm–1 m) over short timescales (<1 h) remains a significant challenge in the practical implementation of these functional soft materials. This is particularly the case where vertical alignment is desired. In this perspective, we highlight the utility and flexibility of magnetic fields for controlling alignment in such systems. Under appropriate conditions, near single-crystal materials can be readily produced over large areas, offering a route to truly scalable microstructure control.

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
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      Water-mediated transport in ion-containing polymers (pages 9–20)

      Michael A. Hickner

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22381

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      Water–polymer interactions control the properties of ion-containing membranes. High rates of ion transport in these types of polymers are promoted by fast water diffusion. The transport tradeoffs in new materials can be optimized by modifying the chemical composition and ionic domain structure of the membrane. Understanding the behavior of these materials, as reviewed here, is critical to designing next-generation materials for fuel cells, electrical energy storage devices, and water treatment membranes.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
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    1. Absorption and engulfing transitions in nanoparticle infiltration into a polymer brush: A monte carlo simulation (pages 21–26)

      Yantao Chen and Jeff Z. Y. Chen

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22369

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      Understanding of the interaction between a polymer brush and macromolecules is essential for applications such as antibiofouling surface coatings and suspensions of colloidal particles. Monte Carlo simulations of the infiltration process of a hard, spherical nanoparticle into a polymer brush provide insights into how they would interact with, for example, metallic particles or bacteria. Two transitions are observed in this work: a randomly diffusing nanoparticle absorbs onto the brush surface and then infiltrates into the deep region of the polymer brush, completely engulfed by polymer chains.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Perspectives
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. The influence of solid-state microstructure on the origin and yield of long-lived photogenerated charge in neat semiconducting polymers (pages 27–37)

      Obadiah G. Reid, Jennifer A. Nekuda Malik, Gianluca Latini, Smita Dayal, Nikos Kopidakis, Carlos Silva, Natalie Stingelin and Garry Rumbles

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22379

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The photophysics of poly(3-hexylthiophene) films is important because of the central role this polymer plays in transistor devices or organic solar-cells. However, the yield of free charges upon photoexcitation of neat films has remained controversial because of a wide variation between previous measurements. This controversy is resolved by showing that the yield of free charges depends sensitively on the solid-state microstructure of the film, which is controlled through molecular weight and processing conditions.

    2. Solvent-free inkjet printing process for the fabrication of conductive, transparent, and flexible ionic liquid-polymer gel structures (pages 38–46)

      Ute Löffelmann, Nan Wang, Dario Mager, Patrick J. Smith and Jan G. Korvink

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22346

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      Ionic liquid-polymer gels are a relatively new and promising class of flexible organic conductive materials. In these gels, ionic liquids are surrounded by intertwined polymer chains or networks that form a shaping matrix. For the application of precise microstructured geometries in Microsystems Engineering, inkjet printing is an established technique. A new and solvent-free process for the fabrication of inkjet printed ionic liquid-polymer gel microstructures with high resolution, good electrical conductivity, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility is presented.

    3. Physics of organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (pages 47–54)

      Jakob J. Brondijk, Kamal Asadi, Paul W. M. Blom and Dago M. de Leeuw

      Version of Record online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22363

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      Ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) are ideal for non-volatile memory applications, because of their non-destructive data read-out and low power consumption. An analytical model that describes the charge transport in organic FeFETs is presented. Key elements are the expression for the ferroelectric polarization and for the charge transport in organic semiconductors. For both unipolar and ambipolar FeFETs good agreement is obtained with parameters that are directly linked to the physical properties of the device materials.

    4. Tailoring block copolymer morphologies via alkyne/azide cycloaddition (pages 55–64)

      Xinyu Wei, Joseph W. Strzalka, Le Li and Thomas P. Russell

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22364

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      As block copolymers are often used as scaffolds and templates for nanostructured materials, it is necessary to control their morphologies. A convenient approach to manipulate block copolymer morphologies via alkyne/azide Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition has been systematically investigated. Phase behaviors of the neat alkyne-functionalized diblock copolymers are strongly dependent on the mole fraction of the alkyne functionality. Microphase separated morphologies after the reaction are dependent on both the composition of neat copolymers and the mole ratio between the alkyne and azide groups.

    5. One-pot synthesis of polymer/inorganic hybrids: toward readily accessible, low-loss, and highly tunable refractive index materials and patterns (pages 65–74)

      Manuela Russo, Mariano Campoy-Quiles, Paul Lacharmoise, Toby A. M. Ferenczi, Miquel Garriga, Walter R. Caseri and Natalie Stingelin

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22373

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      A hybrid material is presented that can be readily produced in water via a one-pot synthesis directly from commercially available, low-cost precursors. The material's extinction coefficient is <0.01 in the visible wave length regime, and the refractive index can be controlled to adopt values between 1.5 to and 2.1, allowing the fabrication of waveguides based on local heating and the demonstration of all-solution-processed dielectric filters and lenses.

    6. Determination of volume fractions and ligand layer thickness of polymer/CdSe quantum dot blend films by effective medium approximations (pages 75–82)

      Martin Schädel, Krischan F. Jeltsch, Phenwisa Niyamakom, Frank Rauscher, Yunfei Zhou, Michael Krüger and Klaus Meerholz

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.22380

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      Hybrid blends of polymers and inorganic nanoparticles (NP) comprise great potential for high-efficiency organic solar cells. Such cells are dominated by structures in the nanometer range. However, experimental techniques investigating the morphology are rare due to this small dimension. This article reports on a new method to identify the thickness of the organic capping layer of the NP and the volume ratio of the blend. The approach uses optical models (effective medium approximation) and is based on spectroscopic ellipsometry data.

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