Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 10

15 May 2012

Volume 50, Issue 10

Pages i–ii, 669–737

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
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    3. Reviews
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      Cover Image, Volume 50, Issue 10 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23084

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      Shape memory polymer foams exhibiting uniform cell structure and densities as low as 0.015 g/cc are prepared using a combination of physical and chemical blowing processes, as presented by Pooja Singhal, Jennifer N. Rodriguez, Ward Small, Scott Eagleston, Judy Van de Water, Duncan J. Maitland, and Thomas S. Wilson on page 724. A dense covalently crosslinked structure gives them a high modulus, resulting in strong shape recovery and high volume expansion from a fully compressed state. In vitro biocompatibility test results suggest potential usage of these materials in biomedical applications.

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
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      Nanocomposites from biopolymer hydrogels: Blueprints for white biotechnology and green materials chemistry (pages 669–680)

      Carole Aimé and Thibaud Coradin

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23061

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      This review presents key concepts and recent achievements in the emerging area of functional bionanocomposite hydrogels design. Through a careful control of the bio-organic/inorganic interface, it is possible to obtain novel materials that combine improved thermal and mechanical stability with tailored optical or conduction properties. Stimuli-responsive and bioactive materials can also be designed for in vivo applications. Future developments in the context of green materials and biotechnological devices can also be foreseen.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
    1. Oxygen permeability in thermoplastic polyurethanes (pages 681–693)

      Yuxin Wang, Mohit Gupta and David A. Schiraldi

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23053

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      The oxygen transport phenomenon of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) can be interpreted by studying its permeability, diffusivity, and solubility. Solubility is a quotient of permeability and diffusivity, which can be derived from the steady state and the nonsteady state of a typical permeation flux curve respectively. TPU oxygen permeability is related to its chemical structures. By varying the soft segment species and its ratio to hard segment, TPU with desired oxygen permeability can be achieved.

    2. Monte carlo simulations of polydisperse polymers grafted on spherical surfaces (pages 694–705)

      Paul M. Dodd and Arthi Jayaraman

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23057

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      This computational study shows how polydispersity in polymers grafted on spherical surfaces affects polymer chain conformations, grafted layer thickness, and free end monomer distribution within the grafted layer. Polydispersity has typically been considered an undesirable feature of polymer synthesis, but results here suggest that deliberately introduced polydispersity can alleviate monomer crowding within the grafted layer, leading to features that are different from those seen in monodisperse systems.

    3. Mechanical properties of glass continuous poly(cyclohexylethylene) block copolymers (pages 706–717)

      Ameara S. Mansour, Timothy P. Lodge and Frank S. Bates

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23058

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      Many applications require a polymer that simultaneously exhibits high modulus, ductility, optical clarity, and thermal stability. In order to create materials that fulfill these requirements, linear triblock and pentablock copolymers that self-assemble into glassy, unentangled matrices of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (C) with hexagonally-packed cylinders of rubbery poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (P) or semicrystalline polyethylene (E) were synthesized and characterized. This article reports the effect of the architecture and the state of the minority component on the bulk mechanical properties.

    4. Strain-induced crystallization and mechanical properties of functionalized graphene sheet-filled natural rubber (pages 718–723)

      Bulent Ozbas, Shigeyuki Toki, Benjamin S. Hsiao, Benjamin Chu, Richard A. Register, Ilhan A. Aksay, Robert K. Prud'homme and Douglas H. Adamson

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23060

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      The recent use of functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) as a filler for natural rubber (NR) has improved its mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and barrier properties. Synchrotron X-ray scattering coupled with real-time sample stretching is used to study the effect of FGS on the strain crystallization behavior of NR. The graphene sheets align with the direction of stretching and induce the onset of crystallization at significantly lower strains as compared to other fillers.

    5. Ultra low density and highly crosslinked biocompatible shape memory polyurethane foams (pages 724–737)

      Pooja Singhal, Jennifer N. Rodriguez, Ward Small, Scott Eagleston, Judy Van de Water, Duncan J. Maitland and Thomas S. Wilson

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23056

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shape memory polymer foams exhibiting uniform cell structure and densities as low as 0.015 g/cc were prepared using a combination of physical and chemical blowing processes. A dense covalently crosslinked structure gives them a high modulus, resulting in strong shape recovery and high volume expansion from a fully compressed state. In vitro biocompatibility test results suggest potential usage of these materials in biomedical applications.

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