Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 13

1 July 2012

Volume 50, Issue 13

Pages i–ii, 877–943

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Perspectives
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 50, Issue 13 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 23 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23101

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      As presented by Bulent Ozbas, Christopher D. O'Neill, Richard A. Register, Ilhan A. Aksay, Robert K. Prud'homme, and Douglas H. Adamson on page 910, the cover image presents functional graphene sheets (FSGs) in a natural rubber matrix. FGSs are shown to be multifunctional nano-fillers for several types of elastomers. FGSs simultaneously improve mechanical properties, reduce gas permeation, and impart electrical conductivity. This combination of property improvements is unavailable in any other filler, including carbon black and nanoclay. The improvements in mechanical properties are shown to be due to the unique shape of FGSs, with their high aspect ratio and crumpled morphology.

  2. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Perspectives
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Light to work transduction and shape memory in glassy, photoresponsive macromolecular systems: Trends and opportunities (pages 877–880)

      Timothy J. White

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23079

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      Photoresponsive macromolecular systems are targeted for rapid, engineered macroscopic and spatially selectable mechanically adaptive responses, useful in aerospace, automotive, and biomedical applications. A holistic understanding of the interconnections of the photomechanical output of a material to the mechanics of the geometry as well as the photochemistry and polymer physics of the material is within reach. This perspective discusses the opportunities available for polymer chemists and physicists to partner and tackle these remaining challenges.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Perspectives
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Injectable hydrogels (pages 881–903)

      Derek J. Overstreet, Dipankar Dutta, Sarah E. Stabenfeldt and Brent L. Vernon

      Article first published online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23081

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      When made injectable, hydrogels can reduce the invasiveness of medical procedures, which in turn reduces surgical and recovery costs. Advances in polymer science have provided new injectable hydrogels for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. A number of these injectable hydrogel systems have reached the clinic and impact the health care of many patients. However, a remaining challenge is translating the ever-growing family of injectable hydrogels to the clinic.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Perspectives
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Brushless and controlled microphase separation of lamellar polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide thin films for block copolymer nanolithography (pages 904–909)

      Parvaneh Mokarian-Tabari, Timothy W. Collins, Justin D. Holmes and Michael A. Morris

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23082

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      Self-organized block copolymer systems have considerable potential in lithographical applications for the fabrication of nanoelectronic devices. Reported here is a “stepwise thermo/solvent annealing” process allowing the formation of perpendicular domains of polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide (PS-b-PEO) lamellar structures while avoiding brush or other surface modifications. PEO block was etched by inductively coupled plasma, achieving line patterns with well-defined half pitches. The remaining PS pattern was used as a mask template to transfer the pattern to the silicon substrate, resulting in the fabrication of silicon nanowires.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Perspectives
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Full Papers
    1. Multifunctional elastomer nanocomposites with functionalized graphene single sheets (pages 910–916)

      Bulent Ozbas, Christopher D. O'Neill, Richard A. Register, Ilhan A. Aksay, Robert K. Prud'homme and Douglas H. Adamson

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) are shown to be multifunctional nanofillers for several types of elastomers. FGS simultaneously improves mechanical properties, reduces gas permeation, and imparts electrical conductivity. This combination of property improvements is unavailable in any other filler, including carbon black and nanoclay. The improvements in mechanical properties are shown to be due to the unique shape of FGS, with its high aspect ratio and crumpled morphology.

    2. Regioregularity and solar cell device performance of poly(3-dodecylthienylenevinylene) (pages 917–922)

      Jianyuan Sun, Cheng Zhang, Swaminathan Venkatesan, Rui Li, Sam-Shajing Sun and Qiquan Qiao

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23078

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      Regioregularity of π-conjugated polymers is an important parameter which affects physical and electronic properties. Influence of side chain regioregularity on photovoltaic performance is investigated here in bulk heterojunction solar cells based on a series of poly(3-dodecylthienylenevinylene)s and 6,6-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. It is found that regiorandomness has no detrimental effect on device performance, in sharp contrast to poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results suggest that introduction of side chain regiorandomness is an effective strategy to enhance processability of certain types of polymers without a reduction in photovoltaic performance.

    3. Polymerization shrinkage of (meth)acrylate determined by reflective laser beam scanning (pages 923–928)

      Yu Jian, Yong He, Tongzhou Jiang, Chunguang Li, Wantai Yang and Jun Nie

      Article first published online: 25 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23086

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      Measuring the shrinkage of polymers during UV curing is vital to help minimize material failures and shortened service lives. A reflective laser scanning method based on a new laser displacement sensor was developed to directly measure the shrinkage of UV monomers with thin sample geometry (<100 μm) and low viscosity. This noncontact method is accurate and precise, and it is shown to be applicable to different kinds of (meth)acrylates.

    4. Strain rate and temperature dependence of a nanoparticle-filled poly(dimethylsiloxane) undergoing shear deformation (pages 929–937)

      Lei Yan, David A. Dillard, Robert L. West, Kenneth J. Rubis and Glenn V. Gordon

      Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23088

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      The mechanical response of a polymer is greatly affected by the addition of nanoparticles to the polymer matrix. The effects of strain rate, temperature, and recovery time from the Mullins effect are presented for a polydimethylsiloxane-based nanocomposite loaded in cyclic shear. The effects of strain rate and temperature on the nonlinear stress–strain response are adequately described by thermal shift factors obtained from small-strain viscoelastic characterization. Interestingly, the recovered yield strength could be nearly 40% higher than the initial value for specimens tested at the lower temperatures.

    5. Effects of prepolymer structure in holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (pages 938–943)

      Min Woo Jang, Tae-Hoon Yoon and Byung Kyu Kim

      Article first published online: 28 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23090

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      The morphology and electro-optic properties of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have attracted considerable interest for potential applications, such as displays and smart windows. The grating formation kinetics, diffraction efficiency, and electro-optical performance of HPDLCs were investigated and found to be greatly influenced by the type and molecular weight of the polyol. This dependency is due to the mixture viscosity, crosslinking density, and glass transition temperature of the film, as well as the anchoring energy of the LC molecule on the polymer surface.

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