Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 50 Issue 22

15 November 2012

Volume 50, Issue 22

Pages i–ii, 1515–1596

  1. Cover Image

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    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communications
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      Cover Image, Volume 50, Issue 22 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23193

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      The cover shows thermal wrinkles that develop on the surface of a metal capped polymer thin film, as presented by Edwin P. Chan, Qinghuang Lin, and Christopher M. Stafford on page 1556. These wrinkles form in composite thin films at elevated temperatures due to thermal expansion differences of the materials. The wrinkle wavelength evolves with annealing time and temperature, and can be directly related to the elastic and viscous properties of the polymer. In this work, thermal wrinkling is demonstrated as a thin film measurement tool for quantifying the elastic and viscous properties of polymer layers with varying degrees of crosslinking.

  2. Reviews

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    3. Reviews
    4. Communications
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      Polymer brushes on flat and curved surfaces: How computer simulations can help to test theories and to interpret experiments (pages 1515–1555)

      K. Binder and A. Milchev

      Version of Record online: 26 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23168

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      Polymer brushes, grafted on flat and curved surfaces, exhibit unique structural properties and rich functional behavior at different conditions. Besides challenges to basic science, they present fascinating possibilities for technological applications in industry and medicine. The current understanding and theoretical description of polymer brushes are reviewed with emphasis on scaling concepts and diverse theoretical approaches. Results from computer simulations and pertinent experimental evidence are summarized in view of their consequences for the understanding of polymer brushes.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Reviews
    4. Communications
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    1. Quantifying the elasticity and viscosity of geometrically confined polymer films via thermal wrinkling (pages 1556–1561)

      Edwin P. Chan, Qinghuang Lin and Christopher M. Stafford

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23152

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      Thermal wrinkling, a surface instability phenomenon that occurs in a sandwiched polymer film heated to elevated temperatures, is utilized as a measurement tool to study the viscoelastic properties of polymer thin films. With the aid of analytical expressions that accounts for geometric confinement, the time- and temperature-dependent evolution of the wrinkle wavelength can be quantitatively correlated to the elastic modulus and shear viscosity of the polymer layer.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Communications
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    1. Polymer BHJ solar cell performance tuning by C60 fullerene derivative alkyl side-chain length (pages 1562–1566)

      Christian Kästner, Christoph Ulbricht, Daniel A. M. Egbe and Harald Hoppe

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23141

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      A systematic study on the influence of the alkyl side-chain length of C60-based fullerene derivatives in BHJ solar cells using an anthracene-containing poly(p-phenylene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(p-phenylene-vinylene) polymer (AnE-PVstat) is conducted. It is shown that the length strongly affects the individual photovoltaic parameters. The best donor/acceptor mating led to a maximum performance of 4.8%.

    2. Electrical and optical simulations of a polymer-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode with high efficiency (pages 1567–1576)

      Mahmoud Al-Sa'di, Frank Jaiser, Sergey Bagnich, Thomas Unger, James Blakesley, Andreas Wilke and Dieter Neher

      Version of Record online: 11 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23158

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      The optical and electrical characteristics of highly efficient phosphorescent polymer-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are comprehensively simulated. The system comprises an emissive layer of a blend of non-conjugated polymer with electron-transporting side groups with an iridium-based green phosphorescent dye and a hole-injecting/electron-blocking layer sandwiched between metal electrodes. The simulations show that performance is primarily limited by the hole-injection barrier, so lowering this could increase the power efficiency of the device by up to 50%.

    3. Extruder-made TPO nanocomposites. I. Effect of maleated polypropylene and organoclay ratio on the morphology and mechanical properties (pages 1577–1588)

      Rajkiran R. Tiwari, Douglas L. Hunter and Donald R. Paul

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23154

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      Thermoplastic olefins are commercially important materials; however, their low stiffness due to the presence of elastomer makes them unsuitable for many applications. Here, the elastomer particle size is significantly reduced with the addition of MMT and maleated polypropylene which provides a balance of toughness and stiffness. The toughness increases with the increase in the PP-g-MA/organoclay ratio while the ductile-brittle transition temperature is reduced in the presence of MMT.

    4. Physical aging and deformation kinetics of polycarbonate (pages 1589–1596)

      Dirk J. A. Senden, Johannes A. W. van Dommelen and L. E. Govaert

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23161

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      The current understanding of physical aging of glasses is that it results in an increase of activation barriers to plastic deformation. Surprisingly, however, a significant change in the temperature dependence of plastic deformation in polymeric glasses has, until now,never been observed experimentally. This study convincingly shows that this temperature dependence indeed changes with aging, which is important to take into account in constitutive models.

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