Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 10

15 May 2013

Volume 51, Issue 10

Pages i–ii, 775–853

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 10 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23292

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      The cover image shows an electron micrograph of a PLGA fiber scaffold that has been seeded with fibroblasts (false-colored). A number of cells can bridge the micrometer-scale gap between fiber rails. As outlined in the Review by Aftin Ross and Joerg Lahann on page 775, this type of control over three-dimensional scaffold microstructure is one of the important design criteria for scaffolds, in addition to material choice, ligand presentation, and the like (image credit: T. Eyster and J. Jordahl).

  2. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
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      Surface engineering the cellular microenvironment via patterning and gradients (pages 775–794)

      Aftin M. Ross and Joerg Lahann

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23275

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      The influence of patterning and interfacial gradients on the cellular response has numerous applications in tissue engineering and basic cell science. Various methods for fabricating small-scale patterns and interfacial gradients as well as their potential and limitations are described. Furthermore, the impact of patterns and gradients on cellular function for numerous cell types and the use of these techniques to address biological questions in in vitro environments are illustrated. Future perspectives are also provided.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
    1. Simple physical model for chemomechanics (pages 795–801)

      A. Shemesh, S. Stolyarova, Y. Nemirovsky and Y. Eichen

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23273

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      The interaction between gas-phase small molecules and polymer-coated microcantilevers results in interesting bending patterns. These bending patterns are modeled using diffusion-reaction equations. The model reveals the significance of two competing processes, namely, diffusion rate of the small molecules into the polymer and the relaxation of the guest(s)-polymer complex.

    2. Nanoassemblies with light-responsive size and density from linear flexible polyelectrolytes (pages 802–816)

      Daniel Moldenhauer and Franziska Gröhn

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23276

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      Light-triggerable supramolecular particles are built from linear polyelectrolytes and isomerizable dye counterions. UV-irradiation causes a size decrease and compaction of the particles that are stable in aqueous solution. The interplay of non-covalent interaction forces, enthalpic and entropic effects and the role of electrostatic stabilization through a remaining excess surface charge density of the assemblies are discussed.

    3. Swelling behavior of gelatin-ionic liquid functional polymers (pages 817–825)

      Rui Nuno Leitão de Carvalho, Nuno Miguel Torres Lourenço, Pedro Miguel Vidinha Gomes and Luís Joaquim Pina da Fonseca

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23252

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      Development of polymeric conducting materials is an important step when planning applications in bioelectrochemistry. In this work, biocompatible gelatin-based hydrogels prepared with ionic liquids are characterized in terms of their swelling behavior in aqueous solutions. These polymers swell much less than hydrogels made solely with gelatin and they dissolve at temperatures above 25 °C. Hydrogel age can be an important factor that determines the maximum swelling, since one type of polymer swells substantially less as more time elapses after its preparation.

    4. A study of the deformation-induced whitening phenomenon for cavitating and non-cavitating semicrystalline polymers (pages 826–841)

      Laurent Farge, Stéphane Andre, Andrzej Pawlak, Christophe Baravian, Sarah C. Irvine and Adrian-Marie Philippe

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23267

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      In the case of semicrystalline polymers, it is generally considered that the deformation-induced whitening phenomenon is due to the development of micrometric size cavities which scatter the visible light. Using a polarized light scattering technique and measurements obtained by X-ray microtomography, it was discovered that light scatterers are not simple cavities and instead may correspond to groups of very spatially concentrated nanovoids scattering the visible light like individual entities.

    5. Effect of chemical modifications on the electronic structure of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (pages 842–846)

      Eliézer Fernando de Oliveira, Alexandre Camilo-Jr, Luiz Carlos da Silva-Filho and Francisco Carlos Lavarda

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23274

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      Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) is the material most commonly used in organic solar cells to capture solar energy and begin the process of transformation into electrical energy, as it has good solubility and oxidation stability. One way to increase the efficiency of these cells is to use a substitute for P3HT that has a lower bandgap. We present theoretical results for 15 derivatives of P3HT, including several promising options.

    6. Volume recovery of polystyrene/silica nanocomposites (pages 847–853)

      Daniele Cangialosi, Virginie M. Boucher, Angel Alegría and Juan Colmenero

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23282

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      The macroscopic volume recovery of polystyrene during physical aging, as measured through traditional dilatometry, is not affected by the presence of nanofillers, where as the local volume recovery, as monitored through the polymer density by using capacitive dilatometry, shows acceleration with increasing the silica content. Hence, the main outcome of this work is that the evolution of macroscopic and matrix densities are markedly different in polymer nanocomposites.

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