Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 14

Special Issue: Responsive Polymers, Particles, and Assemblies

15 July 2013

Volume 51, Issue 14

Pages i–iv, 1061–1123

Issue edited by: Michael J. Serpe

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 14 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23324

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydrogels (like the light-responsive dye-labeled gels pictured on the cover) have the potential to advance the fields of medicine and polymer science as useful components for “smart” devices. Notably, stimuli-responsive hydrogels respond to external stimuli – such as mechanical motion, chemical activation, pH changes, and the application of heat or light – by swelling of the three-dimensional network. Often, these materials display large physiochemical transitions to relatively small stimuli, with the additional benefit of being manipulated under aqueous conditions. In the Review on page 1084 of this joint special issue between the Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry and Part B: Polymer Physics, Jason Locklin et al. highlight recent advancements in stimuli-responsive hydrogels. The stimulus, fabrication methods, design constraints, and novel stimuli-responses are discussed.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover, Volume 51, Issue 14 (pages iii–iv)

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Some microgels, soluble in water, change their solubility state with temperature. PNIPAM microgels dispersed in water, for example, expel water and become smaller if the temperature of the dispersion exceeds 32°C. This temperature-sensitive behavior is fully reversible and can be theoretically calculated. PNIPAM particles also show co-nonsolvency. This means PNIPAM particles are soluble in water and, e.g., methanol at room temperature, but not in certain mixtures of both. The work by Walter Richtering et al. on page 1100 of this joint special issue between the Journal of Polymer Science, Part A: Polymer Chemistry and Part B: Polymer Physics addresses the temperature-sensitive behavior of PNIPAM microgels in co-nonsolvent mixtures of methanol and water and the theoretical description of this behavior.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      pH-responsive polymers for imaging acidic biological environments in tumors (pages 1062–1067)

      Liping Zhu, Patrizia P. Smith and Stephen G. Boyes

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The development of new and improved diagnostic imaging methodologies is predicted to have a major impact on the detection and treatment of cancer. Of particular interest is the measurement of the extracellular pH (pHe) in tumors, which has been identified as a factor in producing more aggressive cancer phenotypes. One of the most promising new approaches to imaging the pHe of tumors involves the use of pH-responsive polymers. This Perspective will highlight recent advances made in this field.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Recent advances in the use of the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation for the study of the collapse of polyelectrolyte brushes (pages 1068–1072)

      Sergio Enrique Moya and Joseba Irigoyen

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23311

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The combination of the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique and ellipsometry allows for the quantification of the water content in polyelectrolyte brushes. Knowing the brush hydration it is possible to quantify the percentage of water lost at different ionic strengths and in presence of ions with specific interactions with brush monomers or varying brush density. This Perspective examines progress in the use of these techniques and potential for the future.

  4. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. Responsive core–shell microgels: Synthesis, characterization, and possible applications (pages 1073–1083)

      Thomas Hellweg

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Smart microgels have recently emerged as a new class of responsive materials for applications such as sensors, actuators, and smart carriers in drug delivery or catalysis. Core–shell structures are of particular interest, because they combine features of different polymers, or of a smart polymer and an inorganic material, leading to new intriguing material properties. This Progress Report summarizes some recent work on purely polymer-based core–shell microgels as well as core–shell structures with inorganic cores, highlighting future perspectives and directions.

  5. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Advances in smart materials: Stimuli-responsive hydrogel thin films (pages 1084–1099)

      Evan M. White, Jeremy Yatvin, Joe B. Grubbs III, Jenna A. Bilbrey and Jason Locklin

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23312

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydrogels are used regularly in daily life and are found in consumer products such as shampoos and toothpaste, cleaners, cell cultures substrates, wound dressings, and drug delivery devices. However, advances in stimuli-responsive hydrogel materials may offer methods to make these materials more intelligent in design or purpose. Recent developments in stimuli-responsive hydrogel technologies that respond on the order of seconds to minutes are outlined in this Review.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Progress Reports
    6. Reviews
    7. Full Papers
    1. Temperature dependent phase behavior of PNIPAM microgels in mixed water/methanol solvents (pages 1100–1111)

      Hiroyuki Kojima, Fumihiko Tanaka, Christine Scherzinger and Walter Richtering

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The molecular mechanism of cononsolvency has been studied for linear polymers and macrogels, but there have been only a few studies on microgels. Temperature dependent swelling behavior of poly(N-isopropylacylamide) (PNIPAM) microgels in water/methanol mixtures was studied with DLS and SANS, and the data were theoretically analyzed under the assumption of competitive hydrogen bonds. Around the transition temperature, the methanol composition in the vicinity of the polymer chains is slightly higher than that of the outer solution while the whole methanol composition inside the gel is slightly lower.

    2. Nonlinear depression of the lower critical solution temperatures in aqueous solutions of thermo-sensitive random copolymers (pages 1112–1123)

      Hiroyuki Kojima and Fumihiko Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 28 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aqueous poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-ran-N,N-diethylacrylamide) solutions exhibit nonlinear depression of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) with the monomer composition, but the reasons behind this phenomenon have not been fully explored. Here, the depression of the LCST is theoretically derived on the basis of the theory of cooperative hydration together with the assumption that the sequence length of bound water molecules due to cooperative hydration cannot exceed the length of monomer blocks. The theory compares well with experimental data.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION