Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 4

15 February 2013

Volume 51, Issue 4

Pages i–ii, 231–310

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    3. Reviews
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      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 4 (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23239

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      A family of proteins called reflectins from the Hawaiian bobtail squid function in camouflage by modulating incident light or bioluminescence. The core peptide repeat from this reflectin is genetically encoded, expressed, and processed into thin films with varying thicknesses and layers by flow-coating and spin-coating, as presented on page 254 by David L. Kaplan and colleagues. These films display structural color, suggesting the potential of reflectin-based thin films as color-based biosensors. The recombinant peptides also self-assemble to form patterned films with uniform spacing, which are ordered enough to work as optical diffraction gratings.

  2. Reviews

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    3. Reviews
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      Graphene/polymer composites for energy applications (pages 231–253)

      Yiqing Sun and Gaoquan Shi

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23226

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      Graphene/polymer composites have wide potential applications in energy related systems, especially for fabricating flexible devices. The polymer component can improve the processability and/or flexibility of graphene materials, and also possibly provide them with new functions. In this review, recent achievements in the synthesis and applications of graphene/polymer composites for use in supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, solar cells, and fuel cells are summarized.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
    1. Recombinant reflectin-based optical materials (pages 254–264)

      Guokui Qin, Patrick B. Dennis, Yuji Zhang, Xiao Hu, Jason E. Bressner, Zhongyuan Sun, Wendy J. Crookes-Goodson, Rajesh R. Naik, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto and David L. Kaplan

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23204

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      A recombinant reflectin-based domain refCBA from squid reflectin protein self-assembles to form ordered structures that are similar to diffraction gratings and are able to generate diffraction orders. Solutions of reflectin-based biopolymer are processed into single-thin or multiple thin films and display repeatable reflectance properties, possessing a wide array of structural color due to thin film interference of reflected light.

    2. Flexible active matrix addressed displays manufactured by printing and coating techniques (pages 265–271)

      Jun Kawahara, Peter Andersson Ersman, David Nilsson, Kazuya Katoh, Yasukazu Nakata, Mats Sandberg, Marie Nilsson, Göran Gustafsson and Magnus Berggren

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23213

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      All-printed electronic systems, such as flexible displays, will become a successful ubiquitous technology in the future only if the components are robust and simple to manufacture. Here, a flexible electrochromic active matrix addressed display, including 8 × 8 pixels, is demonstrated by using solution processing based on standard printing and coating manufacturing techniques. Electronic vias connect each electrochromic pixel on one side of the substrate with its corresponding addressing transistor on the other side of the substrate.

    3. Comparison of two types of vertically aligned ZnO NRs for highly efficient polymer solar cells (pages 272–280)

      Irene Gonzalez-Valls, Dechan Angmo, Suren A. Gevorgyan, Juan Sebastián Reparaz, Frederik C. Krebs and Monica Lira-Cantu

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23214

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      Vertically aligned zinc oxide nanorods can be used as an electron-transporting layer for polymer-fullerene solar cells. Here, they are prepared using two different synthesis methods and applied to solar cells in an inverted configuration. The effects of different polymer-fullerene blend combinations and nanorod aspect ratio and dimensions are studied, and it is found that the photovoltaic performance is influenced by many factors, especially by the degree of infiltration of the organic polymer blend within the ZnO nanorod layer.

    4. Structure formation of integral-asymmetric membranes of polystyrene-block-Poly(ethylene oxide) (pages 281–290)

      Janina Hahn, Volkan Filiz, Sofia Rangou, Juliana Clodt, Adina Jung, Kristian Buhr, Clarissa Abetz and Volker Abetz

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23209

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      Integral asymmetric polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) membranes with an isoporous surface layer are fabricated by a combination of block copolymer self-assembly and the nonsolvent induced phase inversion process. The development is based on the determination of the solution and precipitation behavior of PS-b-PEO. The results show that diethyl ether is a suitable nonsolvent in the precipitation process leading to good membrane structures.

    5. Fullerene-based processable polymers as plausible acceptors in photovoltaic applications (pages 291–302)

      Lara Perrin, Ali Nourdine, Emilie Planes, Christian Carrot, Nicole Alberola and Lionel Flandin

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23206

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      The active layer in polymeric solar cells usually consists of a blend of polymer and fullerene molecules, which require solution deposition. To make the process more environmentally friendly and to reduce production costs, solventless processing methods would be advantageous. Here, a series of melt-processable fullerene-grafted polystyrenes are examined to determine optimal properties for use in solar cells. The tests show that polystyrene randomly grafted with 4–12 vol % of fullerene is most appropriate for use as the acceptor in organic photovoltaic cells.

    6. Antibacterial and biocompatible surfaces based on dopamine autooxidized silver nanoparticles (pages 303–310)

      Manthiriyappan Sureshkumar, Dessy Yovita Siswanto, Yong-Cin Chen, Cheng-Kang Lee and Meng-Jiy Wang

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23212

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      Polydopamine (Pdop) coatings on almost any kind of solid surface provide multifunctional groups capable of reducing noble metal ions to metal nanoparticles. In this study, Pdop is applied to different surfaces (polyethylene, poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), and glass), producing silver nanoparticles for antibacterial and catalytic applications. The Ag/Pdop/PE samples not only reveal biocidal effects toward both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria but also possess biocompatibility toward L-929 fibroblasts, suggesting applications in biomaterials and biomedical devices.

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