Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 5

1 March 2013

Volume 51, Issue 5

Pages i–ii, 311–383

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    3. Reviews
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      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 5 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23244

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      Microinjection-compression molding (μ-ICM) is a promising technique for replicating microscale parts for various miniaturized systems. In the work on page 358 by Wei-Sheng Guan, Han-Xiong Huang, and Bin Wang, the isotactic polypropylene micropart with hierarchical crystalline morphology is prepared by μ-ICM, which involves intensive Poiseuille and squeeze flows occurring in the injection and compression stages, respectively. A close relationship is demonstrated between the shear/elongational strain rates and the crystalline structure, based on which a useful route to manipulate the crystalline structure via varying the compression-related parameters is proposed.

  2. Reviews

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      Molecular level studies of polymer behaviors at the water interface using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (pages 311–328)

      Jeanne M. Hankett, Yuwei Liu, Xiaoxian Zhang, Chi Zhang and Zhan Chen

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23221

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      Macroscopic polymer surface properties such as hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and structural stability in water may be extrapolated from microscopic behaviors of polymer functional groups. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) has been used to directly probe polymer molecular vibrational modes at the water interface, revealing functional group orientation changes, movement trends, and ordering at polymer surfaces. This review covers a variety of SFG studies of polymer water interactions performed in the preceding decade to the present.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Reviews
    4. Full Papers
    1. The influence of bending on the performance of flexible carbon black/polymer composite gas sensors (pages 329–336)

      Thomas Kinkeldei, Christoph Zysset, Niko Münzenrieder and Gerhard Tröster

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23219

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      Gas sensing on flexible polymer substrates promises to be a low-cost alternative to common microfabrication of gas sensors on stiff substrates such as silicon and glass. Due to the flexibility of the polymer substrate, gas sensor measurements suffer under mechanical strain, introduced by substrate bending. In this article, the influence of mechanical strain introduced by bending on a polymer composite gas sensor is studied, and methods to reduce this influence are demonstrated.

    2. Dominant ion transport processes of ionic liquid electrolyte in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (pages 337–342)

      Jennifer A. Irvin and Jamie R. Carberry

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23229

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      Electroactive polymers produced from ionic liquid electrolytes exhibit remarkable electrochemical stability. It has been shown that the choice of ion significantly affects transport properties. The ability to electropolymerize in a dilute solution of ionic liquid electrolyte and then perform polymer electrochemistry in neat ionic liquid electrolyte would minimize the amount of ionic liquid used during polymerization and significantly reduce cost and improve stability. Unfortunately, electroactivity decreases significantly.

    3. Monte-carlo simulations of the order–disorder transition depression in ABA triblock copolymers with a short terminal block (pages 343–348)

      S. Woloszczuk, M. Banaszak and R. J. Spontak

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23215

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      Although most ABA triblock copolymers are molecularly symmetric (i.e., the terminal blocks possess the same mass), molecularly asymmetric A1BA2 triblock copolymers are of greater fundamental interest because they can be used to explore the transition from diblock to triblock copolymer in systematic fashion. Here, a lattice Monte Carlo method is used to simulate molten ABA triblock copolymers with a short terminal block to explore the effect of asymmetry on the copolymer order–disorder transition.

    4. Polyvinylidene fluoride-co-chlorotrifluoroethylene and polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene nanofiber-coated polypropylene microporous battery separator membranes (pages 349–357)

      Hun Lee, Mataz Alcoutlabi, Jill V. Watson and Xiangwu Zhang

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23216

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      A new type of battery separator membrane is developed by coating a traditional microporous membrane separator with electrospun polyvinylidene fluoride copolymer nanofibers. The electrospun nanofibers have diameters between 100 and 200 nm and form an interconnected network on the microporous membrane substrate but do not interfere with the microporous structure of membrane substrate. The addition of the polymer nanofibers to the separator membrane improves the electrolyte uptake capacities and separator-electrode adhesion properties for use in batteries.

    5. Poiseuille/squeeze flow-induced crystallization in microinjection-compression molded isotactic polypropylene (pages 358–367)

      Wei-Sheng Guan, Han-Xiong Huang and Bin Wang

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23218

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microinjection-compression molding (μ-ICM) is a promising technique for replicating microscale parts for various miniaturized systems. In this work, the isotactic polypropylene micropart with hierarchical crystalline morphology is prepared by μ-ICM, which involves intensive Poiseuille and squeeze flows occurring in the injection and compression stages, respectively. A close relationship is demonstrated between the shear/elongational strain rates and crystalline structure, based on which a useful route to manipulate the crystalline structure via varying the compression-related parameters is proposed.

    6. Formation of a porphyrin/fullerene light-harvesting system from self-assembly of porphyrin-end-functionalized polycyclohexane and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester: Effects of microphase separation and π–π interactions (pages 368–375)

      Itaru Natori, Shizue Natori, Anna Kanasashi, Kosuke Tsuchiya and Kenji Ogino

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23222

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      Thin films composed of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin-end-functionalized polycyclohexane and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester blends are prepared to investigate their potential as light-harvesting systems within PSCs. The extent to which the absorption bands of the films overlapped the terrestrial solar spectrum is increased considerably when the blends formed a co-continuous structure. These polymer blend films may be considered as viable candidates for light-harvesting systems within PSCs.

    7. Coaxial-electrospinning as a new method to study confined crystallization of polymer (pages 376–383)

      Hongjun Luo, Yong Huang, Dongshan Wang and Jun Shi

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23223

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      Confined crystallization of semicrystalline polymers has been widely studied. In this work, a new method to prepare the confinement environment by using coaxial electrospinning for the confined crystallization of semicrystalline polymers has been explored. This method has been utilized to produce core–sheath nanofibers for functional materials. The crystallization of polyethylene glycol (PEG) confined in a cellulose acetate nanotube and the thermal behaviors of the recrystallized PEG are discussed. The core–sheath nanofibers can provide a novel model for confined crystallization under one-dimensional confinements.

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