Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 6

15 March 2013

Volume 51, Issue 6

Pages i–ii, 385–459

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Communications
    4. Full Papers
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      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 6 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23269

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      Poly(methyl methacrylate) can breathe when it is immersed in a mixture of a non-solvent (water) and good solvent (THF), as presented by Farnaz Farbod, Behzad Pourabbas, and Mehdi Sharif on page 441. In normal breath figure formation, a surface swollen layer is formed by solvent on the glassy polymer. When this is surrounded by a temperature and humidity controlled atmosphere, a combination of concurrent events including evaporation of the solvent and water vapor condensation on the cooled surface lead to formation of regular patterns, the breath figure. However, the surface of a glassy polymer can be decorated much easier by a process called direct breath figure formation, when the regularity of the pattern hasminor priority.

  2. Communications

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    2. Cover Image
    3. Communications
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    1. Swelling of ultrathin crosslinked polyamide water desalination membranes (pages 385–391)

      Edwin P. Chan, Allison P. Young, Jung-Hyun Lee, Jun Young Chung and Christopher M. Stafford

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23235

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      Ultrathin aromatic polyamide (PA) films represent state-of-the-art nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membrane materials for water desalination. In this work, the swelling of semiaromatic crosslinked PA ultrathin films is studied by measuring the constrained, one-dimensional film expansion upon exposure to water vapor. By applying a modified Flory–Rehner theory used to describe the swelling of a constrained polymer network, the film expansion is linked to the properties of the PA network including the Flory interaction parameter and the number of monomer units between crosslinks.

  3. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Communications
    4. Full Papers
    1. Orientation transition of nanorods induced by polymer brushes (pages 392–402)

      Dong Zhang, Jun Cheng, Yangwei Jiang, Xiaohui Wen and Linxi Zhang

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23224

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      The spatial orientations and conformational transitions of nanorods (NRs) within semiflexible polymer brushes are explored via coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. The NRs experience a conformation transition from dispersion to aggregation when the attractive strength between the NRs and the semiflexible polymer brushes strengthens, and the clusters of NRs undergo an orientation transition from vertical direction to horizontal direction with increasing the number of NRs as well as decreasing the grafting density.

    2. All-polymer solar cells utilizing low band gap polymers as donor and acceptor (pages 403–409)

      Yaqi Tang and Christopher R. McNeill

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23233

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      The two low band gap polymers poly{[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl]} (PTB7) and poly{[N,N-9-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,59-(2,29-bithiophene)} (P(NDI2OD-T2)) are successfully paired as donor and acceptor in polymer/polymer blend solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 1.1% is achieved with a peak external quantum efficiency of 18% at 680 nm. Structural characterization of PTB7/P(NDI2OD-T2) blends reveals a favorable microstructure with 9.5-nm thick P(NDI2OD-T2) crystals embedded in an amorphous PTB7 matrix with a lack of larger, mesoscale phase separation.

    3. The effect of mixing methods on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes during the solvent-free processing of multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composites (pages 410–420)

      Murari L. Gupta, Stefanie A. Sydlik, Jan M. Schnorr, Dong Jin Woo, Sebastian Osswald, Timothy M. Swager and Dharmaraj Raghavan

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23225

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      Despite the success in functionalizing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with desired chemical groups, engineering good dispersion and orientation of functionalized MWCNTs in resin remains a challenge. In this work, an effective dispersion of nanotubes in epoxy was achieved by a combination of microfluidic processing and planetary shear mixing. An improved dispersion of MWCNTs in processed samples resulted in an increase in tensile strength of the epoxy resin while the poor dispersion of nanotubes resulted in reduction in the tensile strength of the resin.

    4. Structure of polymer and particle aggregates in hydrogel composites (pages 421–429)

      Ida Berts, Yuri Gerelli, Jöns Hilborn and Adrian R. Rennie

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23230

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      Hyaluronan hydrogels can function as a matrix to incorporate both organic and inorganic substances to enhance tissue growth. Here, a hyaluronan scaffold that has demonstrated good biocompatibility and is used to induce bone regeneration is structurally characterized using small-angle neutron scattering. This technique is sensitive enough to be applied to determine the organization of the polymer chains in situ. The information drawn from the scattering data is correlated to the physical properties and applications of the gels.

    5. Morphology of polylactic acid crystallized during annealing after uniaxial deformation (pages 430–440)

      Jean-Sébastien Hébert, Paula Wood-Adams, Marie-Claude Heuzey, Charles Dubois and Josée Brisson

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23231

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      L-Polylactic acid (PLLA) exhibits polymorphism, and its crystallinity is affected by deformation and annealing time. A comparison of the deformation of PLLA is reported under two uniaxial stretching temperatures (70 °C, or Tg + 10 and 90 °C, or Tg + 30) and two different post-deformation annealing times (15 and 45 min). Longer times give insight on changes in morphology post-deformation. Wide-angle X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry were used to investigate changes in orientation, crystallinity, and relative crystal size/order.

    6. Direct breath figure formation on PMMA and superhydrophobic surface using in situ perfluoro-modified silica nanoparticles (pages 441–451)

      Farnaz Farbod, Behzad Pourabbas and Mehdi Sharif

      Version of Record online: 4 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23238

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      Creation of superhydrophobic surfaces can be achieved by controlling topography via techniques including electrodeposition, nanowire arrays, or more recently, breath figures (BF). The BF method creates surface patterns by streaming humid air over the polymer solution layer, and water droplets create sink marks. In this work, a modified BF method, named direct BF, is proposed and a patterned layer film forms as part of the substrate poly(methyl methacrylate), without applying an external polymer solution. Superhydrophobic silica nanoparticles are grown inside the pattern.

    7. Electrospinning of biostable polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic polyurethanes (pages 452–459)

      David Cozzens, Xinyu Wei and Rudolf Faust

      Version of Record online: 24 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23232

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      Electrospun mats of aligned polymer fibers have various advantages for applications such as filters, fabrics, sensors, wound dressings, and vascular grafts. Electrospinning of a family of polyisobutylene-based thermoplastic polyurethanes yields mats of nanofibers with physical and mechanical properties well suited for biomedical applications. Electrospinning leads to orientation of the polymer chains resulting in high-temperature endotherms. Electrospun porous fiber mats show excellent tensile properties, minimal creep, and high adsorption of blood serum proteins.

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