Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 7

Special Issue: Young Investigators: Interfacing Fundamental Science with Applications

1 April 2013

Volume 51, Issue 7

Pages i–iv, 461–620

Issue edited by: Thomas H. Epps III, Mahesh K. Mahanthappa

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 7 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23279

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer physics informs the design, synthesis, and processing of nanometer-scale polymeric materials for applications ranging across energy generation and storage, directed self-assembly, biologically-functional materials, and nanocomposites. Additionally, fundamental and applied polymer science enables detailed insights into chain motion in polymeric systems. The convergence of fundamental physics and applications is embodied in many polymer systems, including the block copolymers investigated by Thomas H. Epps, III and colleagues, as introduced on page 461. The versatile nanometer-scale structures formed by these copolymer materials in bulk, thin film, or solution environments permit the development of designer materials possessing unique properties for emerging technologies.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Cover Image, Volume 51, Issue 7 (pages iii–iv)

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows an optical micrograph of a topographic feature formed in a thin polystyrene film by the Marangoni effect, as presented on page 535 by Christopher J. Ellison and colleagues. A photochemically patterned surface energy gradient is first programmed in the solid state. Two successive exposure steps are performed, each employing a mask with a regular array of lines and spaces, but different line periodicity and alignment direction. The thickness variations, represented by the brilliant interference colors in the optical micrograph, develop after heating the film above the glass transition temperature where the polymer flows from unexposed, lower surface energy regions to exposed, higher surface energy regions.

  2. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      From fundamental science to advanced technologies (pages 461–462)

      Thomas H. Epps III and Mahesh K. Mahanthappa

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23271

  3. Feature Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Toward tunable and adaptable polymer nanocomposites (pages 463–467)

      Nandula D. Wanasekara and LaShanda T. J. Korley

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23253

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ability to strategically control interfacial adhesion and filler dispersion is critical to the design of adaptable and tunable polymer nanocomposites. An array of design approaches, such as percolating networks, self-assembly based nanostructures and filler surface functionalization, are discussed to engineer novel polymer composites with tailored mechanics and controlled functionality.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Recent advances in conjugated polymer energy storage (pages 468–480)

      Jared F. Mike and Jodie L. Lutkenhaus

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23256

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Conjugated polymers are promising materials for advanced storage applications such as batteries or supercapacitors. These materials store energy through rapid chemical reactions that occur in the polymer backbone. These reactions involve the movement of ions and the generation of electric current, which provides power and energy. Furthermore, conjugated polymers are flexible and are suitable to provide power in a variety of shapes and forms.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Ion transport in sulfonated polymers (pages 481–493)

      Moon Jeong Park and Sung Yeon Kim

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Various means of enhancing the ion transport properties of sulfonated polymers were elucidated, focusing on rational molecular design, creation of nanoscale morphologies, control of size, shape, and orientation of microdomains, and the development of new protic solvents as replacements for water molecules. Although true fuel cells comprising nanostructured sulfonated polymers may still be a distant prospect, the molecular and structural optimization of membranes remains a worthwhile pursuit for enhancing device efficiency.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Design and fabrication of thermally stable nanoparticles for well-defined nanocomposites (pages 494–507)

      Misang Yoo, Seyong Kim and Joona Bang

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23258

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this review, we provide an overview of the recent developments in strategies for the design and fabrication of thermally stable inorganic NPs. The recent investigation on the behavior of thermally stable NPs within the polymer matrices, morphologies of nanocomposites induced by NPs, and examples of their applications are also discussed. These approaches may provide useful strategy to employ the NPs for the fabrication of nanocomposites in diverse applications especially where heat treatment are needed.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Self-assembly and responsiveness of polypeptide-based block copolymers: How “Smart” behavior and topological complexity yield unique assembly in aqueous media (pages 508–523)

      Jacob G. Ray, Ashley J. Johnson and Daniel A. Savin

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23259

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Peptide-based block copolymers self-assemble into a variety of pH and temperature-responsivenanostructures. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials allow for control of molecular weight, and further allow modification to afford topologically complex molecules. This article gives an overview of some recent work in the aqueous self-assembly of peptide-based linear and star block copolymers. As the topological complexity increases, new equilibrium nanostructures and morphological transitions are accessible. (Artwork courtesy of James Goetz.)

    6. You have free access to this content
      Polymer grafted nanoparticles: Effect of chemical and physical heterogeneity in polymer grafts on particle assembly and dispersion (pages 524–534)

      Arthi Jayaraman

      Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This feature article presents a review of work in the area of polymer nanocomposites containing polymer grafted nanoparticles. In particular, this paper highlights recent computational studies that demonstrate that copolymer grafts can be used to tailor assembly of grafted nanoparticles, and polydisperse homopolymer grafts can be used to stabilize dispersions of grafted nanoparticles in a polymer matrix chemically identical to the graft polymer.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Directing convection to pattern thin polymer films (pages 535–545)

      Dustin W. Janes, Joshua M. Katzenstein, Kadhiravan Shanmuganathan and Christopher J. Ellison

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23262

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Convection can be harnessed in many elegant ways to pattern surfaces with polymers, often using uncomplicated, easily accessible equipment and materials. The Marangoni effect produces striking topographic features in a thin polystyrene film, as shown. A photochemically patterned surface energy gradient is first programmed in the solid state. The thickness variations, represented by the interference colors of the optical micrograph, develop after heating the film above the glass transition temperature. The polymer flows from unexposed, lower surface energy regions to exposed, higher surface energy regions.

    8. You have free access to this content
      Stimuli-responsive polypeptide materials prepared by ring-opening polymerization of α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides (pages 546–555)

      Shusheng Zhang and Zhibo Li

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Biodegradable, stimuli-responsive materials are highly desirable for biomedical applications. This article summarizes the most recent progresses on design, synthesis, and structure–property relationships of stimuli-responsive polypeptides prepared from ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides. These novel smart materials include thermo-responsive, redox responsive, photo-responsive, and biomolecule responsive polypeptides. Compared to conventional stimuli-responsive polymers, the properties of these polypeptides are not only determined by their chemical structure of monomers, but also rely on the secondary structure of materials.

    9. You have free access to this content
      New directions in single polymer dynamics (pages 556–566)

      Amanda B. Marciel and Charles M. Schroeder

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23264

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long chain macromolecules play an indispensable role in modern society. Single polymer studies have the potential to reveal fundamentally new information regarding the processing properties and static and dynamic morphology of polymeric materials. Recent advances in single polymer techniques will enable new molecular-level studies in the field of polymer physics, with particular focus on the non-equilibrium dynamics of individual polymers with complex architectures and highly entangled environments.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Substrate interaction effects on order to disorder transition behavior in block copolymer films (pages 567–573)

      Hyungju Ahn, Yonghoon Lee, Hoyeon Lee, Yoonkeun Kim, Du Yeol Ryu and Byeongdu Lee

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23266

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work, the order-to-disorder transition (ODT) in block copolymer (BCP) films is reviewed in terms of the interfacial interaction effects of the substrates and the χ effects between the two blocks. For the BCP films thicker than a critical thickness (Lc) above which the transition is independent of film thickness, a periodic amplification in the block composition for the BCP films suppressed the compositional fluctuation in the film geometry, resulting in the ODT shifts from the bulk ODTs.

    11. You have free access to this content
      Confined glassy properties of polymer nanoparticles (pages 574–586)

      Chuan Zhang, Yunlong Guo and Rodney D. Priestley

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23268

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Much of the understanding about confined polymer properties has been obtained via studies on thin polymer films. Nevertheless, studies on polymers confined to other geometries are becoming increasingly more important as questions difficult to address using thin films are pursued. In this feature article, the impact of nanoscale confinement on the glassy properties of polymer nanoparticles is highlighted.

    12. You have free access to this content
      Physics of engineered protein hydrogels (pages 587–601)

      Minkyu Kim, Shengchang Tang and Bradley D. Olsen

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23270

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer hydrogels constructed from functional protein building blocks yield materials with novel biofunctional, stimuli-responsive, and tunable mechanical properties. Highlighted in this review is the recent research progress in understanding the physics of polymer networks containing protein domains and their effects on hydrogel mechanics and thermodynamics. The unique ability of proteins to control polymer association valency and orientation, polymer chain length, and polymer stress–strain response presents many new challenges in the engineering of protein gels.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorials
    4. Feature Articles
    5. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Grazing-incidence transmission small angle X-ray scattering from thin films of block copolymers (pages 602–610)

      Nikhila Mahadevapuram, Joseph Strzalka and Gila E. Stein

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thin films of lamellar copolymers are popular systems for low-cost nanolithography. To be useful as nanoscale templates, the domains must be oriented perpendicular to the substrate. This work reports a simple method to detect out-of-plane disorder based on grazing-incidence transmission small angle X-ray scattering. Scattering data are analyzed with the Born approximation to quantify the distribution of lamellar persistence lengths throughout the film thickness. These films are characterized by a large population of buried defects.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Vertical confinement and interface effects on the microstructure and charge transport of P3HT thin films (pages 611–620)

      Leslie H. Jimison, Scott Himmelberger, Duc T. Duong, Jonathan Rivnay, Michael F. Toney and Alberto Salleo

      Version of Record online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23265

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Overall crystalline order in organic semiconductors has been suggested to play a significant role in charge transport. Using X-ray diffraction-based pole figures, a quantitative structural analysis of P3HT thin films of varying thicknesses is presented, paying particular attention to crystallinity and interface microstructure. The interface is found to be ∼25% as crystalline as the bulk of the material. Furthermore, the presence of a self-assembled monolayer enhances the density of interface-nucleated crystallites by a factor of ∼20. Charge transport is found to directly correlate with interface crystallinity.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION