Journal of Polymer Science Part B: Polymer Physics

Cover image for Vol. 52 Issue 3

Special Issue: Polymer Optics

1 February 2014

Volume 52, Issue 3

Pages i–ii, 157–279

Issue edited by: Timothy J. Bunning

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspective
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Image, Volume 52, Issue 3 (pages i–ii)

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23435

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nematic liquid crystals spontaneously aligned in polymeric microchannels are used for realizing a nano-/microcomposite switchable structure called POLICRYPS (polymer liquid crystal polymer slides), as discussed in the Perspective by Luciano De Sio and Nelson Tabiryan on page 158. It exhibits interesting optical and electo-optical properties such as uniform morphology, high diffraction efficiency, and low switching voltage. These features represent new opportunities for photonic applications based on the POLICRYPS structures such as displays, active phase retarders, controllable optical routers, and diffractive filters.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspective
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
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      Polymers in photonics: Controlling information by manipulating light (page 157)

      Mariacristina Rumi and Timothy J. Bunning

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23432

  3. Perspective

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspective
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
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      Self-aligning liquid crystals in polymer composite systems (pages 158–162)

      Luciano De Sio and Nelson Tabiryan

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23400

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nematic liquid crystals spontaneously aligned in polymeric microchannels are used for realizing a nano/microcomposite switchable structure called POLICRYPS polymerliquid crystal polymer slides). It exhibits interesting optical and electo-optical properties such as uniform morphology, high diffraction efficiency, and low switching voltage. These features represent new opportunities for photonic applications based on POLICRYPS structures such as displays, active phase retarders, controllable optical routers, and diffractive filters.

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspective
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
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      Azopolymer-based micro- and nanopatterning for photonic applications (pages 163–182)

      Arri Priimagi and Andriy Shevchenko

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23390

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      The aim of this review is to cover the existing research and trigger future research on the development of azopolymer-based micro- and nanopatterning techniques for applications in photonics. These techniques exploit a remarkably simple inscription of large-area surface relief gratings on azopolymer films. Starting with such an azopolymer pattern, one can create a variety of photonic elements, including diffraction gratings, distributed Bragg reflectors, microlens arrays, plasmonic sensors, antireflection coatings, and nanostructured converters of light polarization.

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      Recent advances in polymer network liquid crystal spatial light modulators (pages 183–192)

      Jie Sun and Shin-Tson Wu

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23391

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      Polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) spatial light modulators are attractive for display and photonic applications because they can achieve a fast response time while keeping a large phase modulation depth. However, their power on scattering caused by the grain boundary of LC multidomains hinders their application. In this article, scattering free PNLC spatial light modulators with submillisecond response time are reported from λ = 1.55 μm and λ = 1.06 μm to visible wavelengths.

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      Photorefractive polymers for holography (pages 193–231)

      Brittany Lynn, Pierre-Alexandre Blanche and Nasser Peyghambarian

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23412

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      Photorefractive polymers are a unique material in which a holographic grating can be recorded and rewritten without pre- or postprocessing. This review describes the physical theory and various applications of photorefractive polymers and devices within the current scientific landscape.

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      Light-directed mesoscale phase separation via holographic polymerization (pages 232–250)

      Derrick M. Smith, Christopher Y. Li and Timothy J. Bunning

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23413

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      Holographic polymerization (HP) is a simple, fast, and attractive technique to fabricate complex and functional nanostructures. HP systems exhibit both rich polymer physics and morphology-sensitive properties, ranging from nano- to mesoscales. This review summarizes the coupled photopolymerization and light-directed phase separation process and highlights a diverse selection of HP patterned soft materials.

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      Melt-processed polymer multilayer distributed feedback lasers: Progress and prospects (pages 251–271)

      James H. Andrews, Michael Crescimanno, Kenneth D. Singer and Eric Baer

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23425

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      Multilayer polymer distributed feedback lasers offer advantages due to their large areas available for lasing, flexibility, and ease of manipulation. These multilayer laser films are easily mass-produced through a melt-processed co-extrusion technique. Their versatility is especially evident from the wide range of mechanisms available for tuning the laser output wavelength, including temperature tuning, mechanical stretching using elastomeric polymers, and tuning through the introduction of folded-in structure defects.

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspective
    5. Reviews
    6. Full Papers
    1. Magnetic field-induced morphology-dependent resonances of a coupled composite metglas slab with a polymeric optical resonator (pages 272–275)

      Tindaro Ioppolo and Edoardo Rubino

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Magnetostriction is the elastic deformation that arises when a solid is immersed in an external magnetic field. In this work, a spherical polymeric optical resonator is mechanically coupled to a polymeric composite Metglas slab. When an external magnetic field is applied, the Metglas slab deforms, causing a morphological change in the resonator. This highly sensitive device can be used as a tuning optical element or as a magnetic field sensor.

    2. Photonic electric field sensor based on polymeric microspheres (pages 276–279)

      Amir R. Ali, Tindaro Ioppolo, Volkan Ötügen, Marc Christensen and Duncan MacFarlane

      Version of Record online: 4 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/polb.23429

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The detection of an electric field by measuring the shift of the optical modes (whispering gallery mode) of polymeric microspheres is demonstrated. Two types of spheres are investigated: a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sphere with 60 parts base silicon elastomer-to-1 part polymer curing agent by volume, and a silica sphere coated with a PDMS (uncured) base. Preliminary experiments show that the latter microsphere yields a higher sensitivity (0.027 pm/V m−1) with a measurement precision of ∼1.8 V/m.

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