The religiosity/spirituality of Latina breast cancer survivors and influence on health-related quality of life

Authors

  • Kimberly A. Wildes,

    1. Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Institute for Health Promotion Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Alexander R. Miller,

    1. Texas Cancer Clinic, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Sandra San Miguel de Majors,

    1. Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Institute for Health Promotion Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Amelie G. Ramirez

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Institute for Health Promotion Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX, USA
    • Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Institute for Health Promotion Research, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 8207 Callaghan Road, Suite 353, San Antonio, TX 78230, USA
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Abstract

Objective: The study evaluated the association of religiosity/spirituality (R/S) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) in order to determine whether R/S would be positively correlated with HRQOL and whether R/S would significantly influence HRQOL.

Methods: The cross-sectional study utilized self-report data from 117 Latina BCS survivors. R/S was measured with the Systems of Belief Inventory-15 Revised (SBI-15R) and HRQOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G). Analyses included calculation of descriptive statistics, t-tests, bivariate correlations, and multivariate analyses.

Results: Latina BCS had very high levels of R/S and generally good HRQOL. The SBI-15R total score was positively correlated with FACT-G social well-being (SWB) (r=0.266, p=0.005), relationship with doctor (RWD) (r=0.219, p=0.020), and functional well-being (FWB) (r=0.216, p=0.022). Multivariate analyses revealed that SBI-15R was a significant predictor of FACT-G FWB (p=0.041) and satisfaction with the relationship with the doctor (p=0.050), where higher levels of R/S predicted higher levels of well-being.

Conclusions: Latina BCS had very high levels of R/S, which were significantly, positively correlated with dimensions of HRQOL (SWB, FWB, RWD). Furthermore, these high levels of R/S predicted better FWB and satisfaction with the patient–doctor relationship while controlling for potentially confounding variables. Implications are discussed. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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