Assessing the impact of cancer among Dutch non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors compared with their American counterparts: a cross-national study

Authors

  • Simone Oerlemans,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
    • Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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  • Sophia K. Smith,

    1. Cancer Care Research Program, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USA
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  • Catherine M. Crespi,

    1. Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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  • Sheryl Zimmerman,

    1. Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
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  • Lonneke V. van de Poll-Franse,

    1. Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Eindhoven, The Netherlands
    2. Center of Research on Psychology in Somatic Diseases (CoRPS), Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands
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  • Patricia A. Ganz

    1. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
    2. School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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Correspondence to: Comprehensive Cancer Centre South, Research Department, PO Box 231, 5600 AE Eindhoven, The Netherlands. E-mail: s.oerlemans@ikz.nl

Abstract

Purpose

To understand cultural differences in the impact of cancer (IOC) by (i) performing an independent psychometric evaluation of the Dutch version of the Impact of Cancer Scale version 2 (IOCv2) in a non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) sample and (ii) examining differences between Dutch and American NHL survivors in perceived IOC and identifying associations with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics.

Methods

Data collected from 491 Dutch and 738 American NHL survivors were used in this study. IOCv2 responses were obtained from all survivors; the Dutch survivors also completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core questionnaire, which measures quality of life.

Results

Exploratory factor analysis of the Dutch version yielded a factor solution similar to the American structure but with some subscales merging into single factors. Internal consistency was good; Cronbach's alpha was 0.88 for the Positive and 0.94 for the Negative summary scales. Large differences were observed between survivors, whereby Dutch survivors reported fewer Positive (Δ −0.4, p < 0.001, effect size: 0.27) and more Negative (Δ 0.2, p ≤ 0.001, effect size: 0.13) impacts of cancer independent of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics.

Conclusion

Similar impact domains of the IOCv2 were observed in the Dutch sample, providing evidence that IOCv2 scales measure common and important survivor concerns across two different Western nations. Higher positive impacts for US survivors might be explained by more personal control and availability of supportive services. Future research should focus on determinants of the IOC in both Dutch and American survivors to gain better understanding of the factors that might improve it and suggest how health care may be modified toward that end. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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