Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 10

October 2013

Volume 10, Issue 10

Pages 833–921

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      Plasma Process. Polym. 10∕2013 (page 833)

      David Duday, Franck Clément, Elodie Lecoq, Christian Penny, Jean-Nicolas Audinot, Thierry Belmonte, Kinga Kutasi, Henry-Michel Cauchie and Patrick Choquet

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370028

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      Cover: Superposed NanoSIMS-AFM images showing enrichment in 18O, as indicated by orange-red spots, coming directly from the discharge on the plasma treated bacteria deposited on a polycarbonate filter. 18O fixation on bacteria is high and not homogeneous in Ar-N2-O2 microwave afterglow. Further details can be found in the article by David Duday et. al. on page 864.

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    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 10∕2013 (pages 834–923)

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370029

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    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 10∕2013 (pages 835–838)

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370030

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    1. Heavy Ion Formation in Plasma Jet Polymerization of Heptylamine at Atmospheric Pressure (pages 839–842)

      Jun-Seok Oh and James W. Bradley

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300042

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      Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets show the potential to provid gas-phase, ion-molecule, chain polymerization of unsaturated monomers. Using ambient mass spectrometry, we detect heavy oligomers of the series [nM+H]+ (n up to 6) within the output plume of a heptylamine polymerizing plasma jet flowing into both air and N2 blankets. In air, a complex set of chemical reactions leads to species in which the monomer is combined with water vapour, oxygen, and nitrogen species, while in N2, much simpler peaks of the series, [nM+H]+, C3H8+[nM] and C7H16+[nM]) are detected.

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    1. On the “Growth” of Nano-Structures on c-Silicon via Self-Masked Plasma Etching Processes (pages 843–849)

      Rosa Di Mundo, Fabio Palumbo, Gianni Barucca, Gianfranco Sabato and Riccardo d'Agostino

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300031

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      In a typical CF4 fed plasma self-masking process, silicon nanostructures are formed by the sculpting action of etching, and deposition of amorphous composite matter, likely catalyzed by metal clusters and impinging ions. Passing from low to high power one can pass from typical conic nanostructures to original plume-topped nanocones.

    2. Real-Time Endpoint Detection of Small Exposed Area SiO2 Films in Plasma Etching Using Plasma Impedance Monitoring with Modified Principal Component Analysis (pages 850–856)

      Haegyu Jang, Jaewook Nam, Chang-Koo Kim and Heeyeop Chae

      Article first published online: 15 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300030

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      The goal of this research is to enhance detection limit of etching endpoint. The endpoint is determined by impedance signals from RF IV monitoring system. Voltage, current, and phase harmonics are gathered, and modified principal component analysis is applied to enhance sensitivity for real-time small area SiO2 etching. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is usually used to detect endpoint; the new method that is introduced in this paper is verified by OES.

    3. The Impact of Double Bonds in the APPECVD of Acrylate-Like Precursors (pages 857–863)

      Abdelkrim Batan, Bernard Nisol, Alexandros Kakaroglou, Iris De Graeve, Guy Van Assche, Bruno Van Mele, Herman Terryn and François Reniers

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300054

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      This study focuses on the atmospheric pressure plasma deposition of molecules that only differ by their number of unsaturations, namely allymethacrylate, n-propylmethacrylate, and propyl isobutyrate. The chemical composition and thickness of the resulting coatings, as well as the influence of plasma power are compared. A stabilization of the ester groups and an increase in the deposition rate due to the carbon–carbon double bonds is suggested.

    4. Study of Reactive Oxygen or/and Nitrogen Species Binding Processes on E. coli Bacteria with Mass Spectrometry Isotopic Nanoimaging (pages 864–879)

      David Duday, Franck Clément, Elodie Lecoq, Christian Penny, Jean-Nicolas Audinot, Thierry Belmonte, Kinga Kutasi, Henry-Michel Cauchie and Patrick Choquet

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200173

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      The binding of ROS and RNS on Escherichia coli in microwave late afterglow is followed by using isotopic nanoimaging with an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer. Relationships between plasma composition, plasma treatment duration and the binding of reactive species on and inside bacteria are studied. Atomic nitrogen and atomic oxygen rapidly bind on the bacterial membrane and also rapidly diffuses inside bacteria to react with intracellular material.

    5. Influence of a Rotating Electrode on the Uniformity of an Atmospheric Pressure Air Filamentary Barrier Discharge (pages 880–887)

      Dahai Yu, Qizheng Ye, Fuli Yang, Xiongwei Zeng, Lili Zhao and Dan Tan

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300019

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      The uniformity of filamentary dielectric barrier discharges is primarily determined by the microdischarges spatiotemporal distribution, and could be improved by rotating one of the electrodes. A digital image processing technique described here can be used to quantify the effects of the rotating electrode on the discharge uniformity. The results show that the rotation affects the streamers distribution and improves the discharge uniformity.

    6. Investigation of the Formation Mechanism of Aligned Nano-Structured Siloxane Coatings Deposited Using an Atmospheric Plasma Jet (pages 888–903)

      Charlie P. Stallard, Muhammad M. Iqbal, Miles M. Turner and Denis P. Dowling

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300056

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      An atmospheric pressure plasma jet is used as a one step method for deposition of high surface area nano-structured coatings. Liquid phase HMDSO monomer droplets are injected into the discharge and by variation in discharge regime (through small volumes of N2) and monomer volume, modulation of particulate density distribution, and consequently film morphology is obtained. Surface morphology features including spherical agglomerates and the formation of nano-structured fibers up to 12 μm high are reported. Modeling of plasma droplet interactions, along with SEM and He-ion investigations of dynamic structure formation is investigated.

    7. Swelling and Water Uptake Behavior of Nanofilms Obtained by a Magnetron Enhanced Plasma-Polymerization Process (pages 904–911)

      Michael Bergmann, Dani Zeniieh, Loic Ledernez, Gregory Dame and Gerald Urban

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300009

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      The role of water in biomaterial surface science is believed to be of great importance. A new approach to investigate such interaction is applied by combining three characterization techniques:dynamic contact angle measurements, optical waveguide spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. All together this helps to explain the behavior of nanofilms in aqueous solution.

    8. Study on the Reaction of CCl2F2 with CH4 in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonequilibrium Plasma (pages 912–921)

      Sazal K. Kundu, Eric M. Kennedy, John C. Mackie, Clovia I. Holdsworth, Thomas S. Molloy, Vaibhav V. Gaikwad and Bogdan Z. Dlugogorski

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300053

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      The refrigerant CFC-12, harmful for atmospheric ozone layer and a major contributor to global warming, is treated with methane, in an argon bath gas and in the absence of oxygen and nitrogen using a dielectric barrier discharge nonequilibrium plasma reactor. Significant levels of CFC-12 conversion are achieved at temperatures below 100 °C and the process avoids producing toxic chemicals like CO and HCN. A simplified reaction mechanism is presented.

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