Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 6

June 2013

Volume 10, Issue 6

Pages 493–571

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      Plasma Process. Polym. 6/2013 (page 493)

      Florian Hilt, David Duday, Nicolas Gherardi, Gilles Frache, Julien Bardon and Patrick Choquet

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370016

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      Cover: An original polyphosphate-based coating was synthesized for the first time by a PECVD process at the atmospheric pressure and the plasma polymer structure considered as a part of a new family of organophosphorus coatings was highlighted. Further details can be found in the article by Florian Hilt et al. on page 556.

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    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 3/2013 (pages 494–575)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370017

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
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    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 6/2013 (pages 495–498)

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201370018

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    1. Elimination of E. Faecalis by a New Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Handheld Device for Endodontic Treatment. A Preliminary Investigation (pages 499–505)

      Lukasz Jablonowski, Ina Koban, Marie H. Berg, Eckhard Kindel, Kathrin Duske, Karsten Schröder, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Thomas Kocher

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200156

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      Tissue tolerable, atmospheric pressure plasma technology is a relative newcomer in the field of dentistry. In this in vitro study, plasma is investigated as an alternative antiseptic option in endodontic therapy because of its high antimicrobial potential and capability to penetrate into smallest cavities.

    2. In Situ Polymerization of Aqueous Solutions of NIPAAm Initiated by Atmospheric Plasma Treatment (pages 506–516)

      Ricardo Molina, Cristina Ligero, Petar Jovančić and Enric Bertran

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200121

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      Novel approach to synthesis of PNIPAAm hydrogels without use of chemical initiators and crosslinking agents is presented in this work. Thermosensitive PNIPAAm coatings can be successfully generated by using in situ liquid phase plasma polymerization method. It is proposed that plasma polymerization of NIPAAm monomer is propagated by vinyl radical type mechanism.

    3. X-Ray Reflectometry Characterization of Plasma Polymer Films Synthesized from Triallylamine: Density and Swelling in Water (pages 517–525)

      Mauricio Schieda, Fethi Salah, Stéphanie Roualdès, Arie van der Lee, Eric Beche and Jean Durand

      Article first published online: 11 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200126

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      Plasma films synthesized from triallylamine, envisaged as membranes for fuel cells, have been characterized by X-ray reflectometry. The analysis of the experimental reflectivity curves has shown that the thin films contain a relatively thick bulk layer and a thin superficial layer of different density. Film density and water swelling have been correlated with plasma discharge power, plasma fragmentation mechanism, and film chemical composition.

    4. Protein Adhesion on Atmospheric Plasma Deposited Quaternary Ammonium Salt Coatings (pages 526–534)

      Mick Donegan and Denis P. Dowling

      Article first published online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200078

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      This study investigates the adhesion of proteins onto nm thick quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) coatings, which were deposited onto silicon wafer substrates using an atmospheric plasma jet system. FT-IR and XPS indicated that precursor functionality has been retained in the polymerized QAS films while ellipsometry was used to monitor real time adhesion of BSA, Fg, and IgG proteins on uncoated and QAS coated wafers. The level of protein adhesion appears to correlate with protein charge and structure.

    5. Effects of Ar–N2–O2 Microwave Plasma on Poly-L-Lactic Acid Thin Films Designed for Tissue Engineering (pages 535–543)

      Emna Chichti, Gerard Henrion, Franck Cleymand, Majid Jamshidian, Michel Linder and Elmira Arab-Tehrany

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200124

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      Improvement of surface properties such as contact angle and surface energy of PLA was observed after plasma treatment with Ar–N2–O2 gas mixture. Functionalization of PLA by cold plasma does not change the bulk properties of this biodegradable matrix used in tissue engineering.

    6. Nonequilibrium Plasma-Activated Antimicrobial Solutions are Broad-Spectrum and Retain their Efficacies for Extended Period of Time (pages 544–555)

      Utku K. Ercan, Hong Wang, Haifeng Ji, Gregory Fridman, Ari D. Brooks and Suresh G. Joshi

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200104

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      Application of dielectric-barrier discharge, room temperature atmospheric plasma has been demonstrated to activate simple solutions to turn into potent antimicrobial solutions. These solutions have a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, retained for about two years, which inactivates pathogens in their biofilm forms too in 3 min of plasma activation at 15 min of contact (holding) time.

    7. Plasma Deposition of an Organophosphorus Coating at Atmospheric Pressure (pages 556–563)

      Florian Hilt, David Duday, Nicolas Gherardi, Gilles Frache, Julien Bardon and Patrick Choquet

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300010

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      Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of an organophosphorus compound has been successfully achieved at atmospheric pressure. This deposition technique enables solvent-free single-step process which can be easily scaled up for the treatment of larger pieces. The intricate plasma-polymer structure is highlighted by combining complementary advanced analysis techniques and a new family of polymer is emphasised.

    8. Surface Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Deposited Allyl Methacrylate and Acrylic Acid Based Coatings (pages 564–571)

      Bernard Nisol, Abdelkrim Batan, François Dabeux, Alexandros Kakaroglou, Iris De Graeve, Guy Van Assche, Bruno Van Mele, Herman Terryn and François Reniers

      Article first published online: 17 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200022

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      Allyl methacrylate (AMA) and acrylic acid (AA) are deposited in using of a radio frequency atmospheric plasma torch, and characterized by Infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The thickness of the coatings is evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Whereas the surface chemistry of plasma deposited AA is influenced by the power, AMA seems to be more resistant to plasma induced fragmentation.

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