Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 2

February 2014

Volume 11, Issue 2

Pages 97–195

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
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      Cover Picture: Plasma Process. Polym. 2∕2014 (page 97)

      Manuel Macias-Montero, Ana Borras, Pablo Romero-Gomez, Jose Cotrino, Fabian Frutos and Agustin R. Gonzalez-Elipe

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201470006

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      Front Cover: Low temperature plasma deposition of TiO2 on silver layers and nanoparticles provides the formation of vertical or tilted Ag@TiO2 core@shellnanorods. The cover picture gathers a SEM image of Ag@TiO2 nanorods with an inset of backscattered electron signal showing the inner distribution of silver. A photograph of a water droplet with high contact angle and the evolution of the WCA under UV light are also presented in the cover picture. Further details can be found in the article by Ana Borras et. al. on page 164.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
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      Back Cover: Plasma Process. Polym. 2∕2014 (page 196)

      Francesca Intranuovo, Roberto Gristina, Francesco Brun, Sara Mohammadi, Giacomo Ceccone, Eloisa Sardella, François Rossi, Giuliana Tromba and Pietro Favia

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201470009

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      Back Cover: High porous PCL scaffolds chemically modified by means of low pressure plasma deposition processes, improved the adhesion of osteoblast cells along the edges and inside the square-shaped pores (green stained fluorescence for actin cytoskeleton, blue for nuclei). SR Micro-CT images together with skeleton analysis allowed a detailed morphological characterization. Further information can be found in the paper by Francesca Intranuovo et al. on page 184.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: Plasma Process. Polym. 2∕2014 (page 98)

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201470007

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      PPaP: Past, Present and Perspectives (pages 104–105)

      Riccardo d'Agostino, Pietro Favia, Christian Oehr, Michael R. Wertheimer and Renate Foerch

      Version of Record online: 30 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201400002

  6. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Energy Dissipation in Noble Gas Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharges (APGD) (pages 106–109)

      Hervé Gagnon, Konstantinos Piyakis and Michael R. Wertheimer

      Version of Record online: 20 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300192

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      Precision measurements are presented of the energy, Eg, dissipated per period of the applied ac voltage by atmospheric-pressure glow discharges (APGD) in flows of helium and neon at kHz frequencies. The figure shows typical APGD current peaks for various applied voltages at 20 kHz. We compare our results with data published in the literature.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Communication
    8. Full Papers
    1. Inactivation of Vegetative Microorganisms and Bacillus atrophaeus Endospores by Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) (pages 110–116)

      Uta Schnabel, Mathias Andrasch, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Jörg Ehlbeck

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300072

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      The antimicrobial efficacy of a microwave plasma setup (PLexc®) against E. coli, S. aureus, and B. atrophaeus endospores with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) on glass bottles is investigated. Moreover, the microwave plasma processed air decontaminates the specimen within treatment times comparable to currently common methods like EO, FORM, and H2O2. The decontamination efficiency raised up to 6 log cfu specimen−1 by plasma treatment.

    2. Influence of Water Vapor Addition on the Surface Modification of Polyethylene in an Argon Dielectric Barrier Discharge (pages 117–125)

      Annick Van Deynse, Nathalie De Geyter, Christophe Leys and Rino Morent

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300088

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      It is well known that argon plasmas can successfully alter the surface properties of polyethylene (PE). Moisture content in the plasma has often been viewed as an impurity and when water vapor is intentionally used, it is mostly used in low concentrations. However, in this paper, water vapor up to 41% is added to an argon dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure to profoundly investigate the effect of water vapor addition on the surface modification of PE.

    3. Enhancement of Essential Oil Extraction for Steam Distillation by DBD Surface Treatment (pages 126–132)

      Satoshi Kodama, Butree Thawatchaipracha and Hidetoshi Sekiguchi

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300047

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      In this study, a dielectric barrier discharge plasma is used for surface treatment of lemon peel, followed by steam distillation, to enhance essential oil extraction. The lemon peel surface is damaged by microdischarges, and the essential oil yield is improved. The essential oil composition is influenced by the plasma gas species.

    4. Deposition and XPS and FTIR Analysis of Plasma Polymer Coatings Containing Phosphorus (pages 133–141)

      Kim S. Siow, Leanne Britcher, Sunil Kumar and Hans J. Griesser

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300115

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      Plasma polymerization of tri-isopropyl phosphite (TIP) and diethyl phosphite (DEP) produces coatings containing phosphate and polyphosphate groups. Addition of 1,7-octadiene to TIP leads to phosphonate and phosphate groups in the plasma polymer (pp). Post-plasma aging in air and electrical biasing during deposition have little effect on the chemical composition of TIP pps.

    5. Nano-Sized Surface Patterns on Electrospun Microfibers Fabricated Using a Modified Plasma Process for Enhancing Initial Cellular Activities (pages 142–148)

      Ho Jun Jeon, Hyeongjin Lee and Geun Hyung Kim

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300144

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      Nano-sized pattern surface on electrospun microfibers could be easily obtained by using a selective plasma treatment supplemented with various template sizes. The nanosize-patterned surfaces induced significant initial cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblast-like-cells.

    6. A Mechanistic Study of the Plasma Polymerization of Ethanol (pages 149–157)

      Hasan D. Hazrati, Jason D. Whittle and Krasimir Vasilev

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300110

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      This paper reveals the fragmentation of ethanol during plasma polymerization at different discharge powers. The positive ion mass spectrometry data of the plasma phase demonstrated formation of oligomeric species of the type [M+H]+, [2M+H]+, [3M+H]+, and [4M+H]+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of the deposited films reveals depletion of oxygen at high power which relates well with the greater fragmentation of the monomer detected in the mass spectra.

    7. Microplasma-Induce Liquid Chemistry for Stabilizing of Silicon Nanocrystals Optical Properties in Water (pages 158–163)

      Somak Mitra, Vladimir Švrček, Davide Mariotti, Tamilselvan Velusamy, Koiji Matsubara and Michio Kondo

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300097

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      The photoluminescence of silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) and their stability in water can be enhanced by different processes based on plasma–liquid interactions at atmospheric pressure. These processes lead to surface engineering of SiNCs directly in water avoiding degradation. We compare plasmas sustained by radio-frequency and by direct-current, whereby the two approaches lead to very similar SiNCs optical properties and surface characteristics.

    8. Plasma Deposition of Superhydrophobic Ag@TiO2 Core@shell Nanorods on Processable Substrates (pages 164–174)

      Manuel Macias-Montero, Ana Borras, Pablo Romero-Gomez, Jose Cotrino, Fabian Frutos and Agustin R. Gonzalez-Elipe

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300112

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      The growth of vertical and tilted Ag@TiO2 core@shell nanorods by PECVD is demonstrated. Control on the experimental parameters allows the formation of NRs with tailored morphology on processable substrates at mild temperature. High density NRs surfaces present superhydrophobic behavior tunable till superhydrophilic under UV light. Wetting mechanism and superhydrophobic–superhydrophilic transition are explained within the Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel models.

    9. In Vitro Susceptibility of Multidrug Resistant Skin and Wound Pathogens Against Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) and Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma (DBD) (pages 175–183)

      Georg Daeschlein, Matthias Napp, Sebastian von Podewils, Stine Lutze, Steffen Emmert, Anja Lange, Ingo Klare, Hermann Haase, Denis Gümbel, Thomas von Woedtke and Michael Jünger

      Version of Record online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300070

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      CP exhibits strong and rapid antimicrobial efficacy against clinical relevant microbial skin and wound pathogens in vitro irrespective of multidrug resistance. Our data present first systematic in vitro susceptibility data as data base for the prediction of strain susceptibility to start successful calculated antimicrobial plasma decontamination, disinfection or treatment in vivo.

    10. Plasma Modification of PCL Porous Scaffolds Fabricated by Solvent-Casting/Particulate-Leaching for Tissue Engineering (pages 184–195)

      Francesca Intranuovo, Roberto Gristina, Francesco Brun, Sara Mohammadi, Giacomo Ceccone, Eloisa Sardella, François Rossi, Giuliana Tromba and Pietro Favia

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201300149

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      PCL scaffolds were produced with the solvent casting/particulate leaching and modified with low pressure plasma processes. SR Micro-CT images enabled a detailed morphological study of scaffolds, that together with chemical and wettability information, allowed to correlate scaffolding and plasma parameters to the scaffolds properties. A combination of high porosity and hydrophilicity led to improved adhesion of osteoblast cells on scaffolds in vitro.

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