Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Plasma Processes and Polymers

April 2012

Volume 9, Issue 4

Pages 351–452

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 4/2012

      Colin J. Hall, Peter J. Murphy and Hans J. Griesser

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The cover picture shows an aircraft window (PMMA) positioned below a monomer shower head and a microwave excited alcohol plasma. This treatment improves the adhesion of a subsequently deposited a:SiOxCyHz hardcoating through the dual function of etching the PMMA and the deposition of a compatibilising layer. Further details can be found in the article by C. Hall on page 398.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 4/2012

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290011

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 4/2012 (pages 351–354)

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290009

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Cell Adhesion to PEEK Treated by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition for Active Medical Implants (pages 355–362)

      Firas Awaja, Daniel V. Bax, Shengnan Zhang, Natalie James and David R. McKenzie

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We show that oxygen rich nanofilms “sticky thin film,” deposited on PEEK surfaces from plasma greatly improved cell adhesion (up to 75%) and spreading (up to 81%). Strong correlations were found between cell adhesion and the water contact angle, the polar component of surface energy, and to a lesser extent oxygen concentration of the PEEK surfaces.

    2. Post-synthesis Carbon Nanowalls Transformation under Hydrogen, Oxygen, Nitrogen, Tetrafluoroethane and Sulfur Hexafluoride Plasma Treatments (pages 363–370)

      Sorin Vizireanu, Maria Daniela Ionita, Gheorghe Dinescu, Ionut Enculescu, Mihaela Baibarac and Ioan Baltog

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Post-synthesis plasma treatments of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) modify their morphology and surface chemistry. The morphological changes are caused by plasma erosion of edges or deposition of thin conformal films, while the basic material structure is preserved. Depending on the gas type, various functional groups may be noticed at surface. Such modifications have strong impact on CNWs' wettability.

    3. Amino-rich Plasma Polymer Films Prepared by RF Magnetron Sputtering (pages 371–379)

      Jan Hanuš, Giacomo Ceccone and François Rossi

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study RF magnetron sputtering of nylon 6.6 is used for the deposition of nitrogen rich films. Deposition is followed by N2 H2 plasma post-treatment to enhance NH2 concentration on the surface. The maximal NH2/C concentration reached is 11% with NH2/N 13.5%. The films exhibit small negative ζ-potential at basic pH with isoelectric point at pH 4.5. Bio affinity of the films is tested by QCM.

    4. In Vitro Susceptibility of Important Skin and Wound Pathogens Against Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) and Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma (DBD) (pages 380–389)

      Georg Daeschlein, Sebastian Scholz, Andreas Arnold, Sebastian von Podewils, Hermann Haase, Steffen Emmert, Thomas von Woedtke, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Michael Jünger

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three seconds of cold plasma treatment are sufficient to kill wound germs like Staphylococcus aureus including the multiresistant MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, which are redoutable germs causing substantial infection casualties worldwide. Cold plasma as first physical antisepsis in plasma medicine may become a close argument in the global fight against worldwide expanding multiresistant bacteria and related infections.

    5. Deposition of Fluorocarbon Nanoclusters by Gas Aggregation Cluster Source (pages 390–397)

      Martin Drábik, Anton Serov, Ondřej Kylián, Andrei Choukourov, Anna Artemenko, Jaroslav Kousal, Oleksandr Polonskyi and Hynek Biederman

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gas aggregation cluster source is used for deposition of fluorocarbon nanocluster films. The deposited films are nanostructured with the size of nanoclusters of about 30 nm in average. Their chemical composition is close to that of a conventional bulk polytetrafluoroethylene and they possess super-hydrophobic character.

    6. Hydroxyl Radical Etching Improves Adhesion of Plasma-Deposited a-SiOxCyHz Films on Poly(Methylmethacrylate) (pages 398–405)

      Colin J. Hall, Peter J. Murphy and Hans J. Griesser

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100159

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasma pre-treatments affect the adhesion of microwave plasma deposited a-SiOxCyHzcoatings on PMMA. Significant improvement in adhesion is observed with alcohol plasma pre-treatments, where QCM and XPS data revealed the dual phenomena of initial etching of PMMA followed by post-plasma deposition of a thin alcohol plasma polymer layer, which appears to serve as a compatibilising layer.

    7. Modification of Branched Polyethylene by Aerosol-assisted Dielectric Barrier Discharge (pages 406–416)

      Renate Mix, Joerg F. Friedrich and Norihiro Inagaki

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100052

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Atmospheric DBD plasma treatments using air, water and ethanol aerosols are applied to PE with different degrees of branching. The oxygen incorporation into PE surfaces is found to be independent on the branching of polyethylenes, with air and water DBDs being most efficient. Quantification of OH groups shows that the chemistry of treated surfaces depends greatly on the degree of branching as well as the type of plasma treatment used.

    8. Reactive Oxygen Species in a Non-thermal Plasma Microjet and Water System: Generation, Conversion, and Contributions to Bacteria Inactivation—An Analysis by Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy (pages 417–424)

      Haiyan Wu, Peng Sun, Hongqing Feng, Haixia Zhou, Ruexue Wang, Yongdong Liang, Jingfen Lu, Weidong Zhu, Jue Zhang and Jing Fang

      Article first published online: 24 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper is characterized by the diagnosis of plasma in aqueous environment by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, which is the most direct and sensitive method for detecting radicals. By ESR diagnosis, plasma–water reactions can be elucidated, which is meaningful for guiding its clinical application. We specialize in diagnosing three kinds of reactive species, hydroxyl radical (OH), superoxide anion radical (equation image), and singlet oxygen (1O2), and evaluating their relationships, concentrations, and contributions to sterilization.

    9. Initiated PECVD of Organosilicon Coatings: A New Strategy to Enhance Monomer Structure Retention (pages 425–434)

      Anna Maria Coclite and Karen K. Gleason

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Herein we show a new deposition method, initiated-PECVD (iPECVD), as an alternative to iCVD and PECVD, for the monomers that are not easily polymerizable by iCVD (e.g., the organosilicon monomers) but where a certain structure retention is needed. The addition of a radical initiator allows to ignite a plasma discharge at plasma density as low as 0.07 W · cm−2. In this condition the carbon content of the monomer molecule is completely retained and at reasonably high deposition rate.

    10. Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Plasma Copolymerisation of Maleic Anhydride and Vinyltrimethoxysilane: Influence of Electrical Parameters on Chemistry, Morphology and Deposition Rate of the Coatings (pages 435–445)

      Anton Manakhov, Maryline Moreno-Couranjou, Nicolas D. Boscher, Vincent Rogé, Patrick Choquet and Jean-Jacques Pireaux

      Article first published online: 17 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100184

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Copolymerisation of Maleic Anhydride and Vinyltrimethoxysilane is a versatile technique to deposit organic thin films with a large variety of chemical compositions and morphologies. The average power of the discharge appears as a key parameter to control the anhydride surface functionalization within a range of 2 to 13 at.%.

    11. Non-stick Polymer Coatings for Energy-based Surgical Devices Employed in Vessel Sealing (pages 446–452)

      Sung Kil Kang, Paul Y. Kim, Il Gyo Koo, Ho Young Kim, Jae-Chul Jung, Myeong Yeol Choi, Jae Koo Lee and George J. Collins

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We deposit a non-stick coating on the jaw of tissue fusion devices employing an RF discharge plasma. We demonstrate markedly reduced tissue adhesion in comparison with uncoated and chromium nitride-coated instruments.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION